>28 yo >herniated disc L4-5 what do?

>28 yo
>herniated disc L4-5

what do?

  1. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    Tell us what caused it so that we still might make it for you

  2. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    What caused this? Need more informations to give you proper advice

  3. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    >he never worked discs
    anon i..

  4. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    Is this Powerlifting general thread again?

  5. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    Let me guess, you deadlift for volume over 150kg?

  6. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    >No haha actually putting your spine through insane amount of pressure +3x week is good for you!

  7. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    Rest for as long as strictly necessary. Begin rehab as soon as possible.
    Romanian DL is one of the absolute best rehab exercises for lumbar hernias. Reverse hyperextensions are also great. Stations for the latter used to be really hard to find in commercial gyms, but I've seen them a lot more nowadays.

    • 3 months ago
      Anonymous

      I’ve been lifting for a long time and ever seen anyone do a reverse hyperextension in my life.

      • 3 months ago
        Anonymous

        Usually you don't even know the exercise exists unless you've hurt yourself so yeah. And that's assuming you even have a place to do them to begin with.
        I do them because I slipped L3, like, six years ago. My DL is back up in the 500s now, and I end every posterior chain workout with reverse hypers to keep it from happening again.
        I'm basically stuck doing deadlifts for the rest of my life because if I don't DL for a week my back starts to hurt like a mf.

        • 3 months ago
          Anonymous

          Kettlebell swings. Restore the body parts to working together

    • 3 months ago
      Anonymous

      >Romanian DL is one of the absolute best rehab exercises for lumbar hernias
      Uhm, this is like saying OHP will fix torn rotator cuff.

      • 3 months ago
        Anonymous

        For rehab work you do them with low weight.
        Exercises that strengthen the muscles around an injury are how you prevent recurring injuries.

        • 3 months ago
          Anonymous

          This. I tore my rotator cuff years ago and it just wasn't healing at all. Doc recommended me some light resistance workouts for my right shoulder and it healed up after a couple months.

          • 3 months ago
            Anonymous

            Same. Shoulder is different from back though. If you don't have a severe rotator cuff tear often times it's good enough to rest it for a few months, and then begin strengthening the shoulder girdle slowly. It took me several months to be able to lift completely again (from not being able to even lift my arm for a week or so), and after really focusing on recovery and building my shoulder girdle I made a full recovery. No pain and full ROM now. I just have to be careful and I am always doing mobility work.

    • 3 months ago
      Anonymous

      based

      Take it slow, use the rollers and lay on them for a while.
      Start with simple lying core activation, then cat camels, RDL with butt on wall, stretch femoral biceps.
      Hang from bars and activate core, slowly start twisting.
      Use a pvc bar going though Good mornings, DL, SQT + variations motions with max Valsalva through all the movement range.
      Once you can use the bar, start doing pause reps while doing all of the above.
      Slowly escalate weight, focus on form, slow tempo maximal contraction.

      (l1l2l3 and l4l5 herniated here, recently got one activated again, but you learn to recover over time)
      Mine are from muay and judo while I was younger, as I aged, what I learnt to avoid them is 2 things:
      >Never take DL to failure
      >Never do Rows to failure or at high volume, the moment you do them as a 3rd exercise on a hard day even with 10 reps range, as soon as you lose Valsalva pressure you get fucked.

      >never take dl to failure
      cringe as fuck. absolutely 100% possible to do it safely. the key is to manage training load appropriately - don't go to failure on days that you are fatigued, sore, or hurting. make sure you are fresh. also, warming up properly makes a huge difference. i usually take 3-4 sets of 5 with lmao1pl8 and 1-2 sets of lmao2pl8 before going up
      >t. have had injured back, rehabbed it, and have since taken my deadlift from 534 to 600 and my squat from 413 to 463
      check out alan thrall's back pain vids and barbell medicine's pain content
      a herniated disc is kind of a meme diagnosis which may or may not have anything to do with your pain. they exist in something like 80% of *painfree* physically active adults

      tldr: manage training load and fatigue appropriately (plan your heavy days for when you will be fresh), warm up plenty, and make sure to not stop moving, just find ways to train that don't hurt and slowly work your way back to squatting and pulling heavy

  8. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    Take it slow, use the rollers and lay on them for a while.
    Start with simple lying core activation, then cat camels, RDL with butt on wall, stretch femoral biceps.
    Hang from bars and activate core, slowly start twisting.
    Use a pvc bar going though Good mornings, DL, SQT + variations motions with max Valsalva through all the movement range.
    Once you can use the bar, start doing pause reps while doing all of the above.
    Slowly escalate weight, focus on form, slow tempo maximal contraction.

    (l1l2l3 and l4l5 herniated here, recently got one activated again, but you learn to recover over time)
    Mine are from muay and judo while I was younger, as I aged, what I learnt to avoid them is 2 things:
    >Never take DL to failure
    >Never do Rows to failure or at high volume, the moment you do them as a 3rd exercise on a hard day even with 10 reps range, as soon as you lose Valsalva pressure you get fucked.

  9. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    the real fix to this problem

    • 3 months ago
      Anonymous

      How big is that dildo? Asking for a friend who has suffered from chronic back pain for years.

      • 3 months ago
        Anonymous

        well i am no expert but i belive this is near siswet size

      • 3 months ago
        Anonymous

        If you managed to insert it you would have a whole new list of problems.

  10. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    stem cell + PRP therapy if you want a permanent solution, surgery if you’re a brainlet.

  11. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    this is what heavy deadlifting does
    it's pure ego lifting and you shouldn't do it with heavy weights

  12. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    you're fucked. there is no fix, no way to ever improve it, and no way your back will ever feel the same again. all you can do is take care of your back so that you aren't permanently wheelchair bound by the time you are 40

  13. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    I herniated L4-L5 and L5-S1 last year at 28 as well. If you already have an MRI, then you're likely already seeing a physical therapist to manage pain and movement. Keep track of what kinds of movements cause pain and find ways to do those same movements pain-free (or not at all). Walk as much as you can, avoid sitting upright for prolonged periods of time, and seek out a specialist for an epidural steroid injection (ESI). The injections may take a few attempts to get maximum effectiveness but they'll give you your life back.

    Long term lose weight and work on hip and core strength. Ask your PT if he/she knows of any good trainers with experience for post-rehab back injuries.

    • 3 months ago
      Anonymous

      this is fucking retarded don't avoid certain positions and build fear avoidance behaviors
      also definitely do not fucking get steroid injections
      >>>

      [...]

      medicine articles
      >>>>>>greg lehman
      >>>

      [...]

      model of pain

      • 3 months ago
        Anonymous

        "Nah bro keep reinjuring yourself. You don't want fear avoidance behaviors"
        Don't ever become a doctor.

        • 3 months ago
          Anonymous

          He's right long term though. It took like my 5th physical therapist to show me not to fear movements like I had become accustomed to. Once you initially are healed, it's so important to break through this mental barrier to regain your former self. May not apply to all conditions (mine was worse than OP) but for most.

  14. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    Be yourself 🙂

  15. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    Go ER like right now

    • 3 months ago
      Anonymous

      This is IST not Reddit. ER has a different term here

  16. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    Sumo deadlifts and ab work are what fucked my back up. Conventional deadlifts fixed it

    • 3 months ago
      Anonymous

      Ab exercises with loaded flexion are terrible for your back. Never do them. Instead to isometric stuff like planks, ab wheel ans learn proper bracing in compounds.
      Additional accessory exercises like front squats can target your core

  17. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    I had a bit worse looking L4-5 + another one at 26yo. Now I'm 36yo.

    Had constant sciatica pain for 1½ years. Always kept my back straight when sitting etc.

    Avoided all kinds of pressure. Did weighted pullups, though. Also hanged at the bar so as to decompress the spine and slowly rotated my hips around.

    Then eventually started doing this erector spinae exercise, where you sit at the end of a bench, lean forward, and have a barbell behind your legs. You raise it arms straight, slowly, from a curled up position (leaning forwards) to straight back (leaning a bit forwards). This is exactly what you shouldn't do if you were deadlifting, but do this with a weight of 8-20kg and your back muscles get such a pump they will be stronger and the areas around L4-5 will get nutrients and bloodflow.

    • 3 months ago
      Anonymous

      >Then eventually started doing this erector spinae exercise, where you sit at the end of a bench, lean forward, and have a barbell behind your legs. You raise it arms straight, slowly, from a curled up position (leaning forwards) to straight back (leaning a bit forwards). This is exactly what you shouldn't do if you were deadlifting, but do this with a weight of 8-20kg and your back muscles get such a pump they will be stronger and the areas around L4-5 will get nutrients and bloodflow.
      What is this called, is there a video on youtube for demonstration?

  18. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    Was fucked for years with si joint pain, sciatica, and herniated disc. Learned how to deadlift and squat rippletits style and now no issues

  19. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    Are you a 1rep ego powersharter?

  20. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    Long road to recovery, and the recovery won't be complete ever.

    Best advice is to do EXACTLY what your physical therapist says. Don't miss an appointment, do every exercise they give you no matter how stupid, and prepare mentally to never be able to deadlift/squat again. Fortunately for you, you're young. Biggest thing that will benefit you after physical therapy is building your core to be as strong as possible, and very carefully working your lower back muscles to add support.

  21. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    Unironically get anterior lumbar disc replacement surgery. Best decision of my life, that shit's the real deal.

  22. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    Anon I am 25 and also herniated l5. I went to being fit as fuck to having destroyed my body after a year of OTR trucking. I have no idea what to do. I got the epidural steroid and it didn't do much. I can't run, walk, or even stand for more than 10 minutes before the pain becomes unbearable. I tried chiropractor work too but those guys want an obscene amount of money. Basically they tell you to not expect results for at least a year. One guy I saw said I have to get surgery. Doctors fucking suck. Homeopathy fucking sucks. Godspeed to you. I am 25 and I wouldn't be able to defend my wife if someone attacked her.

    • 3 months ago
      Anonymous

      Upper cervical chiropractic bro, you need your C1/C2 adjusted

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