Any personal trainers here? Or anyone in the pass pay for personal training?

Any personal trainers here? Or anyone in the pass pay for personal training?

So I've recently had a huge influx of people in the last month ask me to be there personal trainer. I started working on my personal training certification because of it.
I've read I can still be a PT without the certification but I still would like to be cerifited.

Was wondering how much a session should I charge since I'm just starting out?
And what tips would you give when it comes to training someone else?

  1. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    Personal trainer here. It's going to depend on you how much you're gonna charge. I would say anything around $40-$100 is fine. Do you give your clients a meal plan to follow or anything else? Or do you just go to the gym with them?

    • 3 months ago
      Anonymous

      not to hijack the thread but are most personal trainers retards from your experience? the only one i've talked to didn't know what Starting strength or stronglifts 5x5 were and he was pissed that I didn't want to pay $40/week for basically a gym buddy.

      • 3 months ago
        Anonymous

        >the only one i've talked to didn't know what Starting strength or stronglifts 5x5 were
        You do realize that this is a point in his favor right?

        • 3 months ago
          Anonymous

          How

      • 3 months ago
        Anonymous

        Yes I would agree a lot of meme trainers out their nowadays. That doesn't surprise me.

        Thank you for the reply!

        >Do you give your clients a meal plan to follow or anything else?
        I'm considering this! Since the program I signed up for also includes the option to get the title for 'Certified Nutrition Coach (CNC)'
        And realistically speaking, I'd probably be giving most people very similar plans(?) unless they have special needs?

        You should tailor the plan to the person that way they can stick to it. For example if your client hates rice, put potatoes/sweet potatoes in the plan instead. Also consider doing virtual training as well.

      • 3 months ago
        Anonymous

        >are most personal trainers retards from your experience?
        >"are most of the people who don't have a better option in life than to work a job with a median annual income 30% below the median annual income dumb?"
        the income bracket of personal trainers is the same as janitors; janitors have an average IQ as an occupation of 91.

        personal trainers as a cohort are one of the dumbest workforces around.

        now you can find smart people everywhere, sure. nobody is dumb because they are a personal trainer. but plenty of people are personal trainers because they are dumb.

    • 3 months ago
      Anonymous

      Thank you for the reply!

      >Do you give your clients a meal plan to follow or anything else?
      I'm considering this! Since the program I signed up for also includes the option to get the title for 'Certified Nutrition Coach (CNC)'
      And realistically speaking, I'd probably be giving most people very similar plans(?) unless they have special needs?

      • 3 months ago
        Anonymous

        Lmao getting a cnc to tell people to eat protein

        >the only one i've talked to didn't know what Starting strength or stronglifts 5x5 were
        You do realize that this is a point in his favor right?

        Quiet chud

        • 3 months ago
          Anonymous

          >Lmao getting a cnc to tell people to eat protein
          It wasn't too much to add to the personal training certification. I figured I should probably have a better understanding of nutrition anyways to help people better.

          Yes I would agree a lot of meme trainers out their nowadays. That doesn't surprise me.
          [...]
          You should tailor the plan to the person that way they can stick to it. For example if your client hates rice, put potatoes/sweet potatoes in the plan instead. Also consider doing virtual training as well.

          >You should tailor the plan to the person that way they can stick to it. For example if your client hates rice, put potatoes/sweet potatoes in the plan instead. Also consider doing virtual training as well.
          Potatoes are a pretty bad carb compard to rice though? But I understand your example, I'd guess it wouldn't be too much of a hassle to do a food place because it's probably a one time thing?
          >Also consider doing virtual training as well.
          Is that still popular after covid?

          • 3 months ago
            Anonymous

            >Potatoes are a pretty bad carb compard to rice though?
            Adherence is more important than effectiveness.

            >I should probably have a better understanding of nutrition anyways to help people better.
            Digestion is one of the more complex areas of biology. All you will ever understand about nutrition is "received wisdom" - to understand enough about nutrition to be able to develop and implement your own plans you'd have to be a cross-functional team of multiple different research scientists and clinical and non-clinical medical professionals. Incidentally this is who prepares the government advice that everyone dabs on.

            The only thing you need to understand about nutrition is who to trust. Then just do what they say.

  2. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    Would love to hear other thoughts!

  3. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    Sort of off topic but this has been weighing on me. I've recently gotten my ACSM personal training certification and I have a bachelor's in health science with a specification in exercise science. I feel like I know my stuff really well but I also don't really look that big and I've been kinda worried that future clients might not take me seriously or even want to work with me in the first place. Any working personal trainers have any thoughts on this matter?

    • 3 months ago
      Anonymous

      I see guys at my gym that are 'small' personal trainers. But they have a lot of strength and are toned

    • 3 months ago
      Anonymous

      most of your clients are going to be fat retards that dont understand that drinking 800 calories a day counts as food

      • 3 months ago
        Anonymous

        That's true. In my gym, the PT's clients are 90% fatass middle aged dudes with potbellies. I talk to them and they refuse to change their diets, yet want to "get in shape". I just got my certification and now I am looking for a good niche to rake it in.

    • 3 months ago
      Anonymous

      That's true. In my gym, the PT's clients are 90% fatass middle aged dudes with potbellies. I talk to them and they refuse to change their diets, yet want to "get in shape". I just got my certification and now I am looking for a good niche to rake it in.

      Go and train pensioners if you can work for your country's health care system in an exercise physiology capacity. I spoke to the guy at my gym who exclusively trains geriatric decrepit old men and women and he just gets them to do shit like box squats and listen to their stories

      • 3 months ago
        Anonymous

        Also this. Especially if you're an ausfag (or even if you're not) because every country on the planet is going to need to start massively increasing funding for aged care very very soon and that will include things like physical training/rehabilitation. They can't keep working until they're 80 if they can't walk.

        In Australia we have the NDIS which is where the government will give you a huge vat of free money to spend on "whatever care you need". Market yourself as an NDIS-accredited active therapy provider (not physiotherapy or OT because those are real jobs - "active therapy" is just whatever the fuck you make up) and charge $300 a session; they're not paying for it so they don't care about the price and all you do is make them do lunges and box squats for 45 minutes 3 times a week and print out an A4 page of "suggested stretches" you find on health direct (use microsoft paint to put white boxes over the watermarks/logos).

        For example:
        https://ourguidelines.ndis.gov.au/would-we-fund-it/improved-health-and-wellbeing/gym-membership
        >Sue’s genetic condition causes intellectual disability, behavioural and learning issues. She wants to improve her personal fitness. She has been unable to join a gym as most gyms can’t accept a member who needs someone supporting her at all times while she exercises.
        >Sue applies for funding for gym membership and for a support worker to help her at the gym.
        >It Sue’s case the planner decides:
        >funding for gym membership is not reasonable and necessary, and funding was not approved
        >if Sue chooses to self-fund her gym membership, we will fund a support worker to help her pursue her personal fitness goal and use the gym equipment.

        Boom. You hand-hold a retarded girl in the gym and bill $75 an hour. Hit up an assisted living facility or three and your books will be full for the year. If you're lucky she even might let you smash.

        • 3 months ago
          Anonymous

          >https://ourguidelines.ndis.gov.au/would-we-fund-it/improved-health-and-wellbeing/gym-membership
          Fuck I wish I lived there and not in Merica

          • 3 months ago
            Anonymous

            Don't be, we spend more on 500,000 disabled people than every other healthcare program combined. It's fucking insane and absurd. It's also really really easy to defraud and organised crime (bikie gangs etc.) are doing so in a systematic way to the tune of literally billions of dollars. As much as 5% of NDIS funding could be fraudulent lmao. This is because stupid fucking disability advocates think any attempt to detect liars is oppressive - probably because most disabled people are also mixing in bullshit funding requests with their real funding requests too. It's like dole bludgers. They might be genuinely unemployed but they lie about other things to get a higher rate of payment.

            I'm a young person and over the course of my life I'm going to have to pay almost double in taxes just to fund lifestyle choices for old people who had every opportunity to save up their own money or who are perfectly capable of going back to work themselves. And we also need to spend more on defence because of China, and more on the environment because of climate change.

            There shouldn't even be an old age pension. If you're not employed you're unemployed - there's no such thing as retirement unless you can fucking pay for it yourself. If you can't work you're disabled, if you can work then why should you get to decide you don't want to and have someone else pay for it?

            Fuck I'm mad.

            • 3 months ago
              Anonymous

              >As much as 5%
              Sorry, I meant 25%.

              Of $25 billion in funding as much as $6 billion may be fraudulent.

    • 3 months ago
      Anonymous

      Depends on your target market. People who want to be bodybuilders want to be trained by bodybuilders. If you're targeting old people it's more important to talk about your specific experience and knowledge of things like pain management, injury recovery, rehabilitation, whatever. If you want to train kids and teens you don't need to be huge but you need to someone they want to be like - you need to market your "lifestyle" and promise that if they get trained by you they too can be like you.

      That's true. In my gym, the PT's clients are 90% fatass middle aged dudes with potbellies. I talk to them and they refuse to change their diets, yet want to "get in shape". I just got my certification and now I am looking for a good niche to rake it in.

      >In my gym, the PT's clients are 90% fatass middle aged dudes with potbellies. I talk to them and they refuse to change their diets, yet want to "get in shape".
      Best you can do with those people is improve their cardio, mobility, flexibility, whatever - they'll never be "in shape" but they can feel better in their every day life even carrying the weight that they've got. I'd just call it "health at every size" but those are forbidden words here lol.

      If they're willing to take steroids/go on TRT then you can build some good muscle mass on them through real strength training and then, once they start to see the muscle, they will become more motivated to make actual lifestyle changes. That takes 8-12 months though even in young kids and middle-aged dads might need as much as 24 months; there's almost zero chance you'll be able to get them to stick with it for that long.

      I find when training middle-aged people the job is mostly education, confidence-building (or shame-reducing, because they're old, weak, and ugly and they know it so they don't want to be seen as "trying too hard" which is usually why they're resistant to strength training properly. They're also usually fairly successful as established late-career professionals so being dumpstered by children in the gym is harsh for them), and "getting active". Kids are easier because they're plenty motivated and they have puberty-roids, but it's impossible to get them to eat enough or be consistent.

  4. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    >to be there personal trainer
    How about you get yourself an ESL trainer?

  5. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    There is one at my gym and he clearly are also training the anus of that old fag he is assisting

    Gym is full of gays. Disgusting

  6. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    All business is sales and marketing. PT is no different.

    You should spend 10 times as much time and effort researching marketing and sales as you do "how to be a good PT". The people who come to you for PT don't know what good training is - that's why they're coming to you. If you do a bad job they won't know so it doesn't matter. What matters is how many feet you get in the door and how you make them FEEL.

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