Are calories from BMR normally included in calories-burned-exercising calculations?

My BMR is 1200 which means I burn around 50 calories per hour just by existing. Say I walk 8 miles in 3 hours. An online calculator estimates that this burned around 500 calories. But I also burned 150 in that same amount of time as part of my BMR. So did walking actually burn roughly 500 on top of the 150 BMR calories, or is the real estimate of extra calories burned by walking actually 350?

Mike Stoklasa's Worst Fan Shirt $21.68

UFOs Are A Psyop Shirt $21.68

Mike Stoklasa's Worst Fan Shirt $21.68

  1. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >My BMR is 1200
    good morning sweet baby post bobs?

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous
  2. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Yes it burned on top of your BMR. BMR is what you burn even if you were comatose. BMR 1200 + 500 from exercise means you burned 1700.
    Theres also TDEE which is BMR + calories burned from activities like fidgeting, walking etc.

  3. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    https://www.sailrabbit.com/bmr/

    Use this tool

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >https://www.sailrabbit.com/bmr/

      What would someone put for "for 20 hours per week, I'm on my feet doing things like cleaning, vacuuming, stocking shelves, and speed-walking around around a store, but I otherwise don't have a set exercise schedule."

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        that's called sedentary, sweetie.

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          >https://www.sailrabbit.com/bmr/

          But I'd imagine that burns a bit more calories than someone who's only job is a desk job, and also doesn't exercise?

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            If your goal is weight loss always underestimate the calories you burn from physical activities. If you're wrong you just get the advantage of more weight loss.

            • 4 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              What if the goal is just to maintain your weight?

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            anon, it isn't that simple.
            you need to deplete your glycogen (stored carbs) before you really start "burning" any calories you've consumed that day from exercise.
            when you're exercising at low intensity, you aren't going to deplete your glycogen stores significantly.
            you'll find that in an 8 mile walk where your HR never goes above 50% peak, you'll burn maybe 200 calories at best.
            whereas if you were running at 80%+ for an hour, you'd burn the same amount of calories as that 8 hour walk.
            for the purposes of the estimation, you are considered sedentary, hopefully the above helps you understand why.

            • 4 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              >(stored carbs) before you really start "burning" any calories
              Stored carbs are calories consumed. It literally doesn't matter if your body is pulling energy from fat stores or glycogen stores because they all come from the same source: calories consumed

              • 4 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                repleting glycogen takes priority over fat storage, eating a meal with your glycogen depleted isn't the same metabolic state as being in "fed" state with full glyocgen.
                you also have to take into account that water follows glycogen, as in 2+ kg of it in fed state. so you'll be consuming a lot more fluids and less calories as a result when glycogen stores are depleted.

            • 4 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              >you need to deplete your glycogen (stored carbs) before you really start "burning" any calories you've consumed that day from exercise.
              Absolute nonsense. Activity burns calories, it doesn't matter whether you're repeatedly regenerating ATP, depleting glycogen or breaking down lipids into fatty acids. Sure, high-intensity exercise might be more efficient in the sense that you burn calories faster but the idea that someone who spends all day on their feet has the same TDEE as someone who works at a desk is divorced from reality.

              • 4 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                you burn a baseline calories regardless of what you do, if you do not exert yourself then you don't magically burn more calories for walking 1000 steps.

              • 4 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                No-one is arguing that. The point being made is that the person who is "doing things like cleaning, vacuuming, stocking shelves, and speed-walking around around a store" is more active than the person with the desk job.
                More active = more calories burned.

                I've somehow gained 5lbs in 2 weeks while exercising everyday and limiting calories. Feeling ready to kms

                Water weight fluctuations due to glycogen level variability, and/or varying levels of food in your guts. Don't lose heart, just be consistent and keep going.

            • 4 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              >you need to deplete your glycogen (stored carbs) before you really start "burning" any calories you've consumed that day from exercise.
              Incorrect. Low intensity aerobic exercise burns a high percentage of fat via beta oxidation of fatty acids. After an overnight fast, or longer fasts, the body burns a higher % of free fatty acids for energy. Glucose oxidation is downregulated to reserve it for intense bursts of activity.
              https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8497689/
              Ctrl+F "beta"
              You can lose body fat without ever depleting glycogen reserves by simply performing low-intensity aerobic exercise like long walks whilst in a fasted state.

            • 4 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              Holy frick what a moron.

  4. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    protip for BMR and fat loss is to always use the lowest number. All the "sedentary/light/moderate/heavy exercise" categories are broad generalizations and guesses. If you want to see success, only count the BMR itself without any of the bullshit estimations. Too many people do that, overestimate their workload or the number just isnt accurate to them and end up overeating thinking they have a bigger deficit than they do and end up not losing any weight or even gaining weight.

    Just take the base number, apply it to the day. Add any exercise you do ontop of that number. Always over calculate the amount you eat and under calculate the amount you burn.

  5. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    look up the METs of the exercise you performed and calculate it yourself

  6. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    No moron, that's why it's called Base Metabolic Rate

    TDEE is what you're looking for, they're two different things

  7. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I've somehow gained 5lbs in 2 weeks while exercising everyday and limiting calories. Feeling ready to kms

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Don't obsess over what the scales say anon. Assuming you're lifting/dieting for aesthetics you want to be as heavy as you can while still being lean. If your waist measurement hasn't increased then you've gained muscle and/or water weight. (Water is good PROVIDED it's intra-cellular not extra-cellular as it makes the muscles look fuller and harder, as opposed to ill-defined and puffy).

  8. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Most calculators will only be showing the "active calories" burned by your activity, not the background metabolic burn rate.

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *