barbell rows

THE DYEL FILTER

>b-but i dont feel it in my lats
dyel
>b-but it hurts my lower back
dyel
>b-but my forearms give up before my back
dyel
>b-but muh pull ups
do both, dyel

  1. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    What does dyel mean

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Google "YouTube BroScience DYEL" Thank me later.

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        I guess you could say you want him to dance with Dom Mazzeti
        >I spent 5 minutes trying to find my Dom Mazzeti picture, so here's a photoshop I did for someone on /b/ yesterday.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >What does dyel mean
      dyel

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Do You Even Lift

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      doing young english ladies

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      look at your arms and you'll understand

  2. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    nothing quite like a few sets of heavy bb rows followed up by a few sets of db rows.

  3. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Take the inverted rowpill.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      this is only good for people who can't do any pull-ups, and even then it's marginal between them and pull-up negatives

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        just do pull ups you freak

        >Just train your lats instead of your upper back y-you freak!!
        This is why you don't take lifting advice from IST. Welcome newfriends

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        you know you can do progressions of this exercise, right?

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      just do pull ups you freak

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      I think what more people need to realize is the fact that RDLs are pretty much a prerequisite to doing barbell rows with good technique. I could never do barbell rows well until I got stronger at RDLs, now I can do barbell rows with strict technique and feel nothing in my lower back. Also I use hook grip on these because I don't want to weaken my grip for pullups later and putting on straps for bb rows is annoying

      Based as fuck, do these at the end of your workout with straps, go all the way until you're doing lengthened partials. Literally free back volume

      this is only good for people who can't do any pull-ups, and even then it's marginal between them and pull-up negatives

      just do pull ups you freak

      Pullups are a vertical pull, and inverted rows are a horizontal pull; not interchangable at all. Dumb

      If you can do pull ups after barbell rows you're training like a bitch

      Nah, you'll just be much weaker. It's actually a good way to tell if you're doing them right, if you're not any weaker on the pullups that means you're doing them wrong because clearly your lats aren't being worked well on the rows.

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >Pullups are a vertical pull, and inverted rows are a horizontal pull
        you know what is an horizontal pull too? literally any kind of fucking row that you can actually easily progressively overload instead of retarded inverted rows

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Inverted rows have an extremely good SFR and if you're already fatigued you're not getting 30 strict reps with full ROM with your feet elevated on a bench unless you're stupidly strong. The point is that you aren't supposed to use them as your main rowing movement (unless you're adding weight but setting it up becomes annoying so meh), you're supposed to do them at the end when you're already tired to accumulate free back volume that won't fatigue you that much. And also even without weight you can progress via adding reps (to a point ofc) and improving rep strictness (slow eccentric, pause, etc)

          How about you just stop having a weak grip?

          The problem isn't that my grip is weak, I can do the rows just fine with double overhand. The issue is that with all the pulling I do + direct forearm work I end up with so much fatigue in my forearms that toward the end of the session I do start to actually fail because of my grip, so removing 4 sets of gripping by using hook grip was my solution, and it has worked well so far.

          I'm saying once you can do a pull-up inverted rows are not necessary. Not that BB rows can be replaced by pull-ups.

          But pullups aren't a replacement for inverted rows because they're literally not the same movement pattern?? Pullups are a vertical pull, meaning mostly lats and teres major, while inverted rows are a horizontal pull, which is more of a holistic back exercise as you get a lot more traps, rhomboids, and rear delts.

          • 2 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            let me be very clear with you:
            there is absolutely no reason to do inverted rows when you can just do pull ups/lat pulldown bb rows/db rows/seal rows or any kind of row variation

            "you are supposed to do em at then end when you are fatigued" is not an argument at all, do a proper routine, work in your bb rows, progress in them, they have no place in a serious workout routine unless you just want to do em just for the sake of doing em, at that point is just junk volume

            the push equivalent would be telling people to do push ups after benching just to feel the burn or some stupid shit like that, sure they arent terrible but why the fuck would you be doing push ups when there are superior options unless your goal is just that, to do push ups

            • 2 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              >there is absolutely no reason to do inverted rows when you can just do pull ups/lat pulldown bb rows/db rows/seal rows or any kind of row variation
              Pullups/lat pulldowns, again, are vertical pulls and are not comparable. For the others, you can have them as the main movement you push progression on while you use inverted rows to accumulate free volume when you are fatigued as they produce less fatigue on a set per set basis. For example, the compound pulling section of a workout could look like:
              >BB row 4x8-12
              >Pullups 4x5-10
              >Inverted Row 3xF
              3 extra sets of upper back volume with little fatigue cost. Simple as.
              >the push equivalent would be telling people to do push ups after benching just to feel the burn or some stupid shit like that
              In reality the "feel the burn" shit would only happen if you did pushups at the start since you could do like 40-50 reps if you have any strength, but if you do pushups (preferably a harder variation such as deficit pushups) at the end when you're already tired you'll be knocked down into a relevant rep range where each set is high quality and will give you a good stimulus. Sure, you could say "just do db bench" but things like pushups/inverted rows tend to produce less fatigue on a set per set basis which is why they are chosen instead.

              • 2 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                christ dude you know we are all aware pull ups are a vertical pull, why do you keep bringing it up? trying to look smart? cant you bring anything else to the table?
                a pull workout includes vertical and horizontal pulls, of course i bring it every time

                >pushups/inverted rows tend to produce less fatigue on a set per set basis which is why they are chosen instead.
                you are the first guy that isnt a calisthenic dude preaching about inverted rows here, no one recommends them unless you have no equipment, i dont know about any of these people that "chose them"

                of course theres no point in discussing with you when you just wanna do bodyweight workouts in the gym, im waiting on all the advantages of inverted rows over other rows that isnt "do them at the end for fatigue", if thats all you can muster as a reason to do em, well why not do drop sets or just do more sets of rows with less weight?

                its not that they have a place in the routine its not that they are better than other rows in any way, its just that you just wanna do em and cant admit thats all there is to it

              • 2 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                >a pull workout includes vertical and horizontal pulls, of course i bring it every time
                Yes but you keep saying that you don't need to do inverted rows if you can do pullups which doesn't make any fucking sense since they aren't the same movement pattern.
                >im waiting on all the advantages of inverted rows over other rows that isnt "do them at the end for fatigue"
                Okay here you go
                >doesn't load the spine or the erectors unlike bb rows
                >closed chain exercise, very easy to keep strict technique while under fatigue
                >easy to set up and do supersets with (eg for example you could easily superset these with say barbell shrugs by just doing inverted rows off of the bar you're using for shrugs in the rack)
                >doing lengthened partials is very easy and feels natural to do unlike most other rowing variations
                These may not sound like much to you but these reasons are very compelling reasons for me to put them in my program, which is why I do them instead of just doing 7 sets of barbell rows as opposed to 4 lol

              • 2 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                >Yes but you keep saying that you don't need to do inverted rows if you can do pullups which doesn't make any fucking sense since they aren't the same movement pattern.
                it might be that you think im someone else i didnt reply to the first post

                all i want to make clear is inverted rows are your own choice but not the optimal choice and not worth it for most people

                >doesn't load the spine or the erectors unlike bb rows
                can be easily fixed by doing seal rows or using lighter weight with strict form
                >easy to set up and do supersets with (eg for example you could easily superset these with say barbell shrugs by just doing inverted rows off of the bar you're using for shrugs in the rack)
                very subjective, but all you need to do rows is a dumbbell, so that doesnt seems as much of a benefit to me
                >doing lengthened partials is very easy and feels natural to do unlike most other rowing variations
                i genuinely recommend db seal rows since they would achieve basically all you get from your inverted rows

                https://i.imgur.com/r9lvvnm.jpg

                So what is the difference between rowing overhand vs underhand like Yate used to do. To me, personally I could always feel the lats better all the way to the insertion. Is that the only difference? Overhand hits upper back more and underhand hits lats more?

                i think you are about right, also underhand hits biceps a bit more

              • 2 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                >all i want to make clear is inverted rows are your own choice but not the optimal choice and not worth it for most people
                Choice, sure but I don't see how it isn't any less optimal than any other row unless you're freakishly strong to the point where you have to add weight which makes the setup much more annoying
                >can be easily fixed by doing seal rows or using lighter weight with strict form
                Seal rows take much longer to setup in most cases (if you have an easy setup, lucky bastard lol good for you) and lighter weight with strict form doesn't necessarily remove the erectors from the equation, it only reduces their involvement while inverted rows do remove them entirely
                >very subjective, but all you need to do rows is a dumbbell, so that doesnt seems as much of a benefit to me
                Fair enough but even then this still requires more equipment than inverted rows considering you literally just need the bar that you are already using for something else anyway
                >i genuinely recommend db seal rows since they would achieve basically all you get from your inverted rows
                I've tried these before and they felt like dogshit, maybe I just had a bad setup but inverted rows feel infinitely better on my back.

              • 2 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                i just do seal rows on a bench, the barbell variation can be tricky so i just use dumbells, inverted rows will require to have a fixed barbell probably on a squat rack and maybe a bench to elevate your feet but i guess if you superset and all that its not a problem

                either way you do you, its fine

              • 2 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                >either way you do you, its fine
                Main point here, honestly I think that although there are some differences most rows are fairly interchangeable, and generally the best ones are going to be the best for you not because they're magical but because they're the best option with your current circumstances (which would be however your gym/home gym is setup)

                https://i.imgur.com/rEzvbVQ.jpg

                The real dyel filter is:
                >Overhand grip
                >Back close to horizontal (bonus hamstring stretch baby)
                >Bar touches bottom of pecs/sternum/ribs
                >Minimal torso movement until you're cheating out those last few reps

                I have never seen anyone else do it like this at my gym. In fact, I rarely see barbell rows except from one other guy who does the "standing up 2 inch range of motion underhand bicep row".
                Come to think of it, I don't see many pullups at my gym either. Everyone does the seated row machine. It seems training back without machines is a rare sight at my gym.

                This is exactly how I do mine except I use a hook grip and I do mine off of a deficit as well

              • 2 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                Hook grip is great, I don't use hookgrip for rows or deadlifts when possible because I want to train my forearms but I will switch to hookgrip if my grip is giving out. If my grip is REALLY giving out, then I will use straps.

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        How about you just stop having a weak grip?

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        I'm saying once you can do a pull-up inverted rows are not necessary. Not that BB rows can be replaced by pull-ups.

  4. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    If you can do pull ups after barbell rows you're training like a bitch

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      They hated him for telling the truth

  5. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Do you guys use a thumbless grip on BB rows?

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      I do, but I have an issue here I use my biceps and forearms to do back work when I don't.
      Also my grip is good so I just cup the bar and it's fine.

      [...]
      >Just train your lats instead of your upper back y-you freak!!
      This is why you don't take lifting advice from IST. Welcome newfriends

      accurate

      https://i.imgur.com/r9lvvnm.jpg

      So what is the difference between rowing overhand vs underhand like Yate used to do. To me, personally I could always feel the lats better all the way to the insertion. Is that the only difference? Overhand hits upper back more and underhand hits lats more?

      In my experience, yes. That's why I do them both, but I do my bb rows almost pendlay style so I get more low back/erector work, where yates I do at 75 degrees or so.

  6. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Barbell rows of all variations are a shit tier lift. Want to go heavy do dumbbell rows, pullups, seated hammer row thing. Want to get a bigger back, do seated cable rows/ pulldowns with a close grip attachment. Barbell rows are only useful for cool photoshoots if you're a pro bodybuilder. Never seen a strongman do any barbell rows now that I think about it and they have the biggest strongest backs bar none.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      I dont know a single person that goes to the gym and just do barbell rows, of course everyone uses cables, dumbbells, machines, etc.
      All of them have a place in any back/pull routine

  7. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    So what is the difference between rowing overhand vs underhand like Yate used to do. To me, personally I could always feel the lats better all the way to the insertion. Is that the only difference? Overhand hits upper back more and underhand hits lats more?

  8. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    that's funny because the only people I see doing this dogshit exercise are dyels

  9. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I dont do them because I dont like to stick my butt out like a fag and have everyone stare at it

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      I do it in hopes that one of the varbies at my gym will come up and smack my ass and offer to be my dommy mommy gf

  10. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    The real dyel filter is:
    >Overhand grip
    >Back close to horizontal (bonus hamstring stretch baby)
    >Bar touches bottom of pecs/sternum/ribs
    >Minimal torso movement until you're cheating out those last few reps

    I have never seen anyone else do it like this at my gym. In fact, I rarely see barbell rows except from one other guy who does the "standing up 2 inch range of motion underhand bicep row".
    Come to think of it, I don't see many pullups at my gym either. Everyone does the seated row machine. It seems training back without machines is a rare sight at my gym.

  11. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    It's not a great exercise. T bar rows and seated cable pulls are much better

  12. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    wide manlets with short arms are the only group that has the physiology to benefit from this exercise. Seated row, chest supported incline db row, 1 arm db row, machine rows, t bar row, chest supported rows etc... all of these are better exercises

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