for tennis/sports

Anons who actually play sports requiring strength and conditioning: what type of training has helped you the most?

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  1. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    [racial slurs]

  2. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    look up sport specific training dude idk
    I imagine tennis players probably do a lot of shit with exercise bands and sidestepping for footwork drills and then a lot of cable fly stuff in different angles to work on their swing

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Yeah. There's a tennis player who works out at my gym. He does a lot of unilateral optometric stuff, medicine ball throws, etc. Ultimately, specificity is key so I imagine he does most of his training on a court with racket in hand

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        *plyometric

  3. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I play football (soccer) and my throw ins are basically corner kicks. Defenders can't do shit to knock me off my stride either.
    There's no reason to not get yoked.

  4. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    https://startingstrength.com/article/the-two-factor-model-of-sports-performance
    No need to thank me.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      I'm sure Nadal did plenty of sets of fahve in his day.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Total bullshit.

  5. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Damn was Nadal really this jacked back in the day? Pretty cool, respect

  6. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Damn Nadal looks like THAT?!

  7. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I play football (soccer) as well. The most beneficial exercise i did for football was cycling. My running/stamina levels were always the highest on the pitch and i was one of the quickest when i was like 26-28. Im 30 now and my burst is slower but im trying to improve and do more cardio

    I started lifting last year and it helped my football a lot. I used to be very injury prone. Kicks to the ankles and my game was over. Used to walk in pain for hours after a game. Now i feel much stronger, i get less injuries in the game.

  8. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    For every sport the best way to train is to train the speed strength curve.
    The speed strength curve is the relation between max strength and max speed, max strength is going to be slow no matter what because it takes time to develop that force and max speed doesn't have much force because is too fast to produce significant amounts of it, inbetween theres strength speed and speed strength which are both expressions of power.

    No matter the sport, getting stronger will allow you to develop more force once you train power and speed, is like building a bigger engine, being stronger will result in being able to apply more force will result in a harder racket hit that makes the ball fly much faster and you train it with conventional strength training and isometrics.

    For power, strength speed will allow you to develop high amounts of force, if strength will already improve your strike, this will improve it even further.
    This is trained by doing oly lifts or conventional lifts with a slow eccentric and fast concentric using 80-90% of your 1rm.
    Then speed strength allows you to develop force quicker and is trained with weighted plyos or anything high speed with resistance or lifts like described in the strength section but with 50-70% of your 1rm and done as fast as possible.
    This is called rate of force development.

    Then speed is trained by doing the activity you want to be fast at as fast as part possible and plyometrics.
    Here you want to do slow and fast stretch plyos which are plyos with short ground contacts like depth jumps and sprints.
    Last there's overspeed training which is the same as speed training but assisted with an elastic band to perform the exercises even faster.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Even if you never do tennis specific exercise just doing these will make you perform much better but ofcourse you can also do tennis specific exercises for strength, power and speed, for example since tennis requires a lot of side to side movement you can do side sledge pulls for strength, then make it lighter so you can do it faster for power or use an elastic bandnto do side to side shuffles resisted and then do it assisted for speed.

      Best way to train all of this is by doing phases where you train each aspect at the time and keep the other phase aspect at maintenance at the end of your training.
      Or if you prefer you can do ppl or ul splits where you start with speed training, then plyos, then power exercise and finish with strength in the same routine, not as good as training in phases but still pretty effective but only in that specific order.
      Regardless of split you want to do low volume and high rest to make every rep as high quality as possible.
      If you do it before tennis practice just make sure the volume is low enough so you aren't fatigued during tennis practice but doing after tennis is better so you have a bit more volume, still low volume to avoid being too fatigued next day.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      This works only in theory. Since sports have adopted this method, the mantra of "speed is genetic and cannot be trained" has appeared, because this method doesn't increase speed.

  9. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Tennis is gay so I guess sick more dicks to improve your game

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Nah, I used to live with a tennis pro and he had rotating country club b***hes every weekend. Was annoying as frick because his bedroom was adjacent to the kitchen.

  10. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >what went wrong

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >Just

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Time anon
      ....

      Time
      It gets us alll..
      .

      He just ruined the chances of every man who ever tries to woo that girl.

      She went into a coma later and became lived the rest of her life in a vegetable state

  11. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I want to get into tennis so bad, but I don't have anyone to play with. I have friends, but none of them are interested. I live near a tennis court, but I don't want to both people to play when I'm just learning.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      do private lessons for a bit then ask your coach if he can set you up with another one of his students around your level to hit with. get comfortable rallying consistently, learn a simple abbreviated serve on your own, then join a league. you'll meet people very quickly

  12. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    please don't post that sicko nadal here

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      I want a family bros.

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        same...

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          We have to keep trying. There's women worth marrying and starting a family with.

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        same...

        We have to keep trying. There's women worth marrying and starting a family with.

        Incels spotted,

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      He just ruined the chances of every man who ever tries to woo that girl.

  13. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I train for competitive whitewater kayaking (big wave freestyle and downriver creekboat time trials). I've found heavy compounds to be most advantageous. Mainly deadlifts, squats, weighted pull-ups. Bench- somewhat, but kayaking doesn't require much chest strength aside from the odd backstroke.

    For cardio, I run a few times per week.

    Flat water training is most important for developing speed and endurance for downriver racing. Effectively running intervals- sprinting for a few minutes, back to a slow cadence for another couple minutes, repeat.

    Lifting has helped the most with developing explosive upper body strength, very useful for throwing a kayak around on a wave.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Most advice I see is along these lines. I struggle to find good advice on how to schedule such training though. Let's say I play tennis 4 times a week. would I ever run or do strength training on those days as well, or spread them out across my off days? How do you feel that activity outside of your sport affects your recovery?

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        To add- In your case, I'd give anything a try while you're feeling it out. Try strength training earlier in the day, then practice tennis later that day. Feel like your tennis performance was lacking? Try it the other way around. If it's too much, dial back the strength training, possibly keep it to non-tennis days.

        If performance in tennis is your main goal, try out some different schedules and stick with what feels right. Your lifts may not progress as quickly, but at least your tennis performance won't suffer as a result of overtraining/inadequate rest.

        Tennis=priority
        Lifting=supplemental, secondary

        That's how I approach kayak training, at least, and it works well for me.

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        depth jumps, hip flexors/extensors, tib raises, side lunges, and actually training your footwork.

        yes, you can most certainly do both weights and tennis the same day. but be careful of how much volume you do with the weights; you don't want to be depleted. you should increase the intensity so it's sufficient for strength gains

        if you have 4 days off, do leg days before a day on which you don't have tennis.

  14. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Great question. I generally schedule lifting and running days around paddling days. Paddling comes first. I generally play it by ear, which isn't the most "scientific" of approaches, but it seems to work best for me.

    Let's say I get a long workout in on the water, running sprints. The next day I may feel a bit sore, so I go running to let my upper body recover in the meantime and keep blood pumping.

    As for lifting, I lift heavy once or twice per week during the kayak season (late spring-early fall), ensuring that I'm well rested before any major paddling days. My lifts don't increase by much during this time. More to maintain strength than increase it. Kayaking is dependent on water levels, and kayaking always comes first, so there may be 2-3 weeks during the spring where I barely touch a barbell.

    In the off-season, I lift heavy and often. It keeps my upper body in shape while I'm off the water. During fall/winter, I break out of the plateau and progress with lifts. I rarely see lifts suffer as a result of paddling, though I have seen my paddling skills suffer if I don't stay consistent with lifting throughout the winter.

    My main focus here is balance and remaining injury-free. I fractured a vertebrae many years ago due to kayak overtraining, and I don't want to run into that again.

    "Listening to your body" gets thrown around a lot, but it's honestly the best advice I've received over the years. If you spend enough time training, you'll know when you need to lift, when you need to train cardio, when you need to develop skills on the water, and when you need to rest. I'd rather err on the side of undertraining than overtraining, as I've been kayaking for 10+ years now and hope to continue til I'm in the grave.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >"Listening to your body" gets thrown around a lot, but it's honestly the best advice I've received over the years. If you spend enough time training, you'll know when you need to lift, when you need to train cardio, when you need to develop skills on the water, and when you need to rest. I'd rather err on the side of undertraining than overtraining, as I've been kayaking for 10+ years now and hope to continue til I'm in the grave.
      Thanks for the advice. Sounds like I'll need to play it by ear for the time being and see what works best. I like the idea of swimming for cardio actually--might help to give my lower body more of a rest compared to running.

  15. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Speed training a la Nick Curson.

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