Hey?

Hey IST.

Going on a two day hike at the end of this month with some friends of mine. My fitness level is average because I don't exercise except for me being disproportionally good at running for some reason.

I've gone on longer hikes before but I don't think I fully enjoyed them because by the second day I'm really tired.

Will doing cardio exercise until then help prepare me somewhat? How should I go about it? Any other tips?

Thanks.

  1. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    surely just going for longer walks (~2 hours) with a weighty backpack on should help

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Is longer walks a must or does running do the trick just as well?

      You're not gonna be able to condition yourself in like 10 days, there's no point incorporating anything.
      Also it's just two days lol. Just need to make sure you're eating enough its not like you going to get rhabdomyolysis.

      Will conditioning until then really have zero effect? If so, any tips on improving mindset so I'm not so much of a pussy regarding the tiredness?

      Thanks for the eating tip.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >If so, any tips on improving mindset so I'm not so much of a pussy regarding the tiredness?
        Just don't be a pussy, ez.
        Like it really depends on what kind of hiking it is, if you're just on gravel roads or out in the terrain. If it's the latter you can't really prepare for it without without actually walking in terrain. I don't think it's possible to improve endurance in any meaningful way in just 10 days.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      No. Its to soon. Its only 1 week. He can get in like 1 trip that he can recover from and see improvement. But its so small its probably insignificant. Its to late to train for the trip now. And if you train before hand you make your self tired before the trip which just makes it worse.

  2. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    You're not gonna be able to condition yourself in like 10 days, there's no point incorporating anything.
    Also it's just two days lol. Just need to make sure you're eating enough its not like you going to get rhabdomyolysis.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      it's still a shock to the system, prepping could be the difference between feeling fine on day 2 and having a sore body/feet

  3. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I’ve spent more days in my backpacking tent this year than I have in my own bed. Here is my advice:
    >get energel gummies or those little packets of electrolyte jelly, eat one whenever you feel tired
    >eat big dinner, don’t skip breakfast
    >only two days means you shouldn’t try to save weight by leaving out food
    >download the FarOut app and figure out if your trail has water sources
    >if so, but a $20 Squeeze filter and get a bottle of Smart Water from a gas station (these threads interface perfectly), and just drink a shit ton whenever you find water
    >this is because water is by far your heaviest item in your pack
    >do NOT wear hiking boots. Only wear trail runners
    >put 50 miles on your trail runners before you take them out on a real trail
    >bring a journal and write your thoughts at the end of the trip

    That’s it. You don’t need to practice, really, or try to acclimate. The biggest risk you face is getting blisters on your feet. You’ll probably do between 8mi and 14mi realistically. But you can push up to 22mi and you’ll still live, though you will feel it the next day.

    TLDR it’s just walking. You’ve been walking your whole life my nibba.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >TLDR
      most people don't walk on very steep uphills that much. Recently I went on a hike that had a 1.5km elevation gain in less than 7km, on shitty crumbly rock too, and I regretted not having better cardio

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        i live in BC where literally every hike is uphill and whenever friends/family from ontario who consider themselves “hikers” come over here they always get absolutely rinsed on even the biggest and most popular “easy” trails its funny

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      I'm not American or into hiking culture so I'm having difficulties parsing most of what you said but I'll look into it. Thanks anon.

      One of the hikes I did with the friend who is organizing this was over 50km or 31 miles and I was basically the living dead by the end. We don't have a plan for this one yet but let's hope for the best.

      >TLDR
      most people don't walk on very steep uphills that much. Recently I went on a hike that had a 1.5km elevation gain in less than 7km, on shitty crumbly rock too, and I regretted not having better cardio

      I'm from a very flat country (Latvia) that has zero mountains and rarely even has hills so I guess I'll do fine in that regard.

      >If so, any tips on improving mindset so I'm not so much of a pussy regarding the tiredness?
      Just don't be a pussy, ez.
      Like it really depends on what kind of hiking it is, if you're just on gravel roads or out in the terrain. If it's the latter you can't really prepare for it without without actually walking in terrain. I don't think it's possible to improve endurance in any meaningful way in just 10 days.

      What makes terrain so different from roads?

      >If so, any tips on improving mindset so I'm not so much of a pussy regarding the tiredness?
      Just don't be a pussy, ez.
      Like it really depends on what kind of hiking it is, if you're just on gravel roads or out in the terrain. If it's the latter you can't really prepare for it without without actually walking in terrain. I don't think it's possible to improve endurance in any meaningful way in just 10 days.

      No. Its to soon. Its only 1 week. He can get in like 1 trip that he can recover from and see improvement. But its so small its probably insignificant. Its to late to train for the trip now. And if you train before hand you make your self tired before the trip which just makes it worse.

      Okay, I'll start doing cardio anyway because I've been meaning to but won't do any the day of or before. Thanks.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        if you are on relatively flat terrain cardio should be less of an issue, at that point it's mostly a matter of pace. How trained are your friends? Do you already know what kind of distances you'll cover.
        Anyway make sure you drink and eat enough and carry something sugary and with minerals (like the sport gels that you often find in stores), that'll help greatly in feeling less tired on the second day

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        I’ve spent more days in my backpacking tent this year than I have in my own bed. Here is my advice:
        >get energel gummies or those little packets of electrolyte jelly, eat one whenever you feel tired
        >eat big dinner, don’t skip breakfast
        >only two days means you shouldn’t try to save weight by leaving out food
        >download the FarOut app and figure out if your trail has water sources
        >if so, but a $20 Squeeze filter and get a bottle of Smart Water from a gas station (these threads interface perfectly), and just drink a shit ton whenever you find water
        >this is because water is by far your heaviest item in your pack
        >do NOT wear hiking boots. Only wear trail runners
        >put 50 miles on your trail runners before you take them out on a real trail
        >bring a journal and write your thoughts at the end of the trip

        That’s it. You don’t need to practice, really, or try to acclimate. The biggest risk you face is getting blisters on your feet. You’ll probably do between 8mi and 14mi realistically. But you can push up to 22mi and you’ll still live, though you will feel it the next day.

        TLDR it’s just walking. You’ve been walking your whole life my nibba.

        Energels are like pic related. Just little packets and gummies that contain calories and salts and maybe caffeine. They may seem like a gambit but they’re actually pretty great and you can feel the difference before and after once you hit about mile 10. Sometimes they’re like packets of jelly, or like a little tube of peanut butter with added protein and salts or something. They sell them in most outdoors stores. Just buy an assortment and determine which ones are good.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          Just eat some salted peanuts or dried raisins, wtf is your problem. Fucking Skurka wannabes.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            good but not as effective. It's not something you eat often so the fact that it's artificial doesn't really matter

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            Yes you should also be eating trail mix and drinking Gatorade too but this just combines them. This isn’t some evil gnomish plot to trick you into eating onions estrogen to make you i to a chud or something you schizo fuck. It’s just honey + caffeine + salt.

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              Calm down rabbi, also post daily mileage.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >What makes terrain so different from roads?
        What I mean with terrain is an uneven surface and lots of changes in elevation. Why this is more exhausting than walking on a road should be obvious.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      I'm not American or into hiking culture so I'm having difficulties parsing most of what you said but I'll look into it. Thanks anon.

      One of the hikes I did with the friend who is organizing this was over 50km or 31 miles and I was basically the living dead by the end. We don't have a plan for this one yet but let's hope for the best.

      [...]
      I'm from a very flat country (Latvia) that has zero mountains and rarely even has hills so I guess I'll do fine in that regard.

      [...]
      What makes terrain so different from roads?

      [...]
      [...]
      Okay, I'll start doing cardio anyway because I've been meaning to but won't do any the day of or before. Thanks.

      Trail runners are light weight shoes for trail running. Wearing hiking boots is unnecessary weight and it’s quadrupled because you wear that weight on your feet. They also have a wide toe-box so you don’t get cramped because after 10 miles you feet will be swollen with blood. Also get them like one size bigger.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        So hiking boots are a scam?

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          >So hiking boots are a scam?
          Depends on where you're hiking. If it's a flat road you don't need them. If it's uneven you'll need them.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          Hiking boots are only needed for rocky, mountainous, high-elevation-change terrains. There’s only like 40 miles in the entire 2200mi Appalachian Trail that would require them. Not a single trail in Shenandoah NP needs them except maybe one. There are definitely trails in the west that require them but less than you think. I hiked 200 miles in Rocky Mountain the last year with trail runners maybe 80% of the time. Trail runners are suitable for almost any hike that normies go on in a year, and they’re practically a requirement for any multi-day hikes.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            This dude is correct. Not many people use hiking boots anymore. I did the entire AT, the PCT and the Colorado trail in trail runners. Brooks/Hokas/Altra trail runners have all been good to me. If you tend to roll your ankles I would try hoka's with the heel flare, super stable.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Tobacco or specifically chew/snus helps too. Really the only time I consume tobacco is on long hiking trips. Boosts energy and helps focus when you’re really tired. I’ve done tons of long hikes/climbs where it was my saving grace.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        does vaping work?

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          Wouldn’t recommend, I find vapes make me feel like shit compared to chew or snus

  4. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >I don't think I fully enjoyed them because by the second day I'm really tired

    Weak gay. Being the animal you are is essential for living a healthy life. People are miserable because they live in environments that are constructed by other people, engineered for the greater good and not to satisfy individual needs. Be amongst the trees and mossy rocks gay. Your very bones are screaming for it.

  5. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Do HIIT and go on day hikes on hilly terrain with a heavier backpack. Happy trails.
    t. IST
    But

  6. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    stay away from rock formations and large bodies of water bro. and if you get a bad feeling gtfo asap. godspeed

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      I wouldn't worry about it.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        yeah probably nothing

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Carry some white ash to protect you from skinwalkers.

  7. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Go out for a walk every day with the shoes you're going to used and backpack, 10kg is enough. You'll get somewhat used to it so it's not a shock to the system.

    A few light running sessions to keep cardio fresh.

    Have 1-2 rest days before the hike.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >Go out for a walk every day with the shoes you're going to used
      This is probably the best advice in the thread.

  8. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Just carry only what you need in terms of gear and you don't need to be constantly walking, take breaks and enjoy the scene sometimes.

    My parents took me to the 14ers and Capitol Peak when I was 15 and it was a 14 day ordeal. It's not too bad, just have calories on you and if you need to take a break ask em to slow down and sit for 10-15 at a nice view and drink some water, eat some food. Another thing is a good sleeping system, a good sleeping pad and bag is essential, or have a hammock. A day hike where you hike 8h will take 1.5-2L of water, so just keep that on you or have a filter/cooking system.

  9. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    If your gym has a step machine I'd hit that

  10. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >I've gone on longer hikes before but I don't think I fully enjoyed them because by the second day I'm really tired.
    Try eating more. Especially carbs

  11. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Sounds like you're not actually good at running. Git gud motherfucker, I was dropping sub-2 minute 800m and sub 17 minute 5ks in high school.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Also if you wanna get good you gotta do sprint repeats and 10-12 mile runs.

  12. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Anons saying that it wont help you to start conditioning yourself are being retarded. Yes, you cant improve much in 10 days, but a hike is about adaptability. I would reccomend doing some rucking for 8 days before, rest for the two last days. It's more about improving the mental part of the hike on such a low timeframe. See mind/muscle connection.
    For food, lightweight and calories heavy stuff is better, but it has to be enjoyable somewhat. Maybe some homemade honey/nuts/chocolate/grains bars for trail snack. Consider bringing and eating a bunch more than usual, as you are doing a bunch more work than usual. Probably aim for 3k+ cals per day.
    A good backpack also helps not being miserable. Good weight distribution helps to not expand energy for nothing, and lessen the back soreness.

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