how much "fight" can one learn on their own?

I'm just tryna be less of a bitch and one of my deepest insecurities is not knowing how to fight or defend myself.

I'm already gunmaxxing but on the flip side I know the odds are good conflict won't happen when there's a gun lying around so I really need to start fight training.

I'm wrapping up my degree so I'm too busy + its too expensive to hit a training facility in my area -- so I was wondering how much the internet could teach that I can do in the meantime.

  1. 5 months ago
    Anonymous

    About as much baseball as you can learn with just a bat and ball

    • 5 months ago
      Anonymous

      All of it

  2. 5 months ago
    Anonymous

    >how much "fight" can one learn on their own?
    Zero. None. 0. Nada.

    You've been lied to by anime, and seeing the hero become a fighting beast by training in the woods kicking and punching trees and dodging branches.

    If you want to get better at fighting, you must fight. Simple as.

    • 5 months ago
      Anonymous

      Take the holyland pill. Learn boxing stance, jab and straight forms from youtube videos then work up to throwing 5000 punches a day. I'm currently at 2000. After that you hang out on the streets at night time and aim to fight atleast once a day.

      Cope.

      You can learn to throw a punch i guess, but it all amounts to nothing once youre in the ring. Fighting is mostly psychological after you learn basic technique, and if you arent used to violence, you will be fucked up.

      The most you can do on your own is cardio conditioning and shadow boxing. Learn some shadow boxing techniques and shadow box. If you ever get in a real fight, since you have no experience or real skill, you'll have to rely on sheer aggression and basic punching technique to try to land good shots. The only grappling you'll be able to rely on is head locks and bear hugs as a novice since those come natural.
      Watch UFC regularly to get an idea of how fighting works and what they do.

      That's pretty much all you can do without actual sparring and learning real technique.

      >how to throw a punch
      >cardio conditioning
      >shadow boxing
      That's good enough, everything else you can get from experience.

      • 5 months ago
        Anonymous

        number one thing for novices is cardio and aggression.

      • 5 months ago
        Anonymous

        >his source of information is manga
        of fucking course kek

    • 5 months ago
      Anonymous

      After I got into a fight with my sensei, I started training by myself for 3 years. Lots of shadowboxing in front of a mirror. Same fitness bodyweight exercises and stretches. Got a punching bag and trained at home as well. Same 4-5 hours per week of training. I often wondered if what I was learning was useful or not, because it wasn't tested. When I got back together with some of the guys from that group and sparred I had surpassed them.

      I think it's different if you know what to train though. I had some fundamentals to build from.

      Before I learned to fight (before 18), I had often done playfighting as a kid with the intention of getting better. But that was all shit and even people with 6 months of training whooped my ass. Learn the fundamentals.

      • 5 months ago
        Anonymous

        What are the fundamentals for you? What kind of exercises and practices did you do?

  3. 5 months ago
    Anonymous

    shit

  4. 5 months ago
    Anonymous

    You can learn to throw a punch i guess, but it all amounts to nothing once youre in the ring. Fighting is mostly psychological after you learn basic technique, and if you arent used to violence, you will be fucked up.

  5. 5 months ago
    Anonymous

    Fighting is a two person activity. Without a sparring partner, you can't learn anything.

  6. 5 months ago
    Anonymous

    You can learn some by watching techniques but you're really just wasting your time for the most part, you have to drill or else you completely lose most of your technique the moment the adrenaline kicks in and you have to fight.

  7. 5 months ago
    Anonymous

    The most you can do on your own is cardio conditioning and shadow boxing. Learn some shadow boxing techniques and shadow box. If you ever get in a real fight, since you have no experience or real skill, you'll have to rely on sheer aggression and basic punching technique to try to land good shots. The only grappling you'll be able to rely on is head locks and bear hugs as a novice since those come natural.
    Watch UFC regularly to get an idea of how fighting works and what they do.

    That's pretty much all you can do without actual sparring and learning real technique.

    • 5 months ago
      Anonymous

      oh yeah and NUMBER ONE for people with no training. Easy to learn technique.
      If the guy rushes you swinging haymakers and going all out trying to land a KO, simply duck under his fists, bear hug his waist/legs, and trip him so you land on top of him.

      The duck under is the most effective counter to guys rushing and dumping all their energy in big haymaker shots.

      • 5 months ago
        Anonymous

        ALL novice fighters do the same thing in a fight.
        They blow their load going balls to the wall dumping all their energy and swinging for the fences. Just a flurry of haymakers praying something lands.
        If you know to duck under and can stay on top of them on the ground, you'll have an advantage on most people since they all fight the same.

  8. 5 months ago
    Anonymous

    get a heavy punching bag, punching the air will give you a false sense of power, hitting a human and inflicting damage on them is far different, you may punch them pretty hard and feel like you didn't inflict any pain on them, and next moment see them floored

    • 5 months ago
      Anonymous

      also learn where to punch, you can take someone by surprise by punching them in the head on the lobs or side and he'll go down but get sued.
      I suggest learn the liver shot, same effect without the brain damage.

    • 5 months ago
      Anonymous

      Heavy bags teach bad technique.
      Most novices with heavy bags resort to "push punching" where they try to sort of push the bag with their punches to get some kinesthetic feed back that their punches are strong.
      "Push punches" are bad technique and are a weaker punch.
      Also heavy bags make people think their opponent and yourself are just gonna stand there exchanges blows like rockem sockem robots but that doesn't happen IRL.

      • 5 months ago
        Anonymous

        I'm not talking about technique, talking about getting the feel of punching someone, better than punching the air.

        • 5 months ago
          Anonymous

          true

          • 5 months ago
            Anonymous

            I'm not talking about technique, talking about getting the feel of punching someone, better than punching the air.

            But I'd get a punching ball on a spring stick, since that's a lot closer to what's like trying to hit a moving target in the head.

        • 5 months ago
          Anonymous

          also pick fights with your friends, friendly fights, take a bare knuckle punch in the head, you'll see where the weak spots are that can make you dizzy. same with body, you get punched first time in the liver/ribs and you'll go down if you're not used to the shock.

  9. 5 months ago
    Anonymous

    Youtube. Bjjfanatics.com. UFC.

  10. 5 months ago
    Anonymous

    Iron Mike knows best

  11. 5 months ago
    Anonymous

    Why’s everyone saying none when building the cardio is extremely important
    It’s very much worth it to do moves on your own if you simply don’t have someone else to practice with

  12. 5 months ago
    Anonymous

    None.
    Training alone won’t teach you jackshit about proper footwork, feedback, distance, rhythm and all that outside of basic techniques. Even hitting the pads, working the heavy bag and actually sparring all feel different from each other. I can go for a normal 1 2 3 to the body then low kick on the bag all dandy and fine, but getting that full combo on a sparring partner is another thing.
    So if you’re serious about it, go join a gym.

  13. 5 months ago
    Anonymous

    very little my friend. The intensity of an actual fight will be more than you can imagine, you won't be used to getting punched so you'll probably wince/close your eyes at first, you won't have experience reading other peoples body language to expect punches/kicks/takedowns, you'll probably have a predictable rhythm, you'll probably telegraph your moves a lot, your accuracy will probably be wonky, getting hit will probably throw you off and open your guard, your spacing and range will be off so the other guy can punch you then leave your range or corner you so you can't escape them, you'll probably be overwhelmed in general and lose a lot of your form. You can definitely condition yourself and practice combos though, but it's like anything you can learn the combos but remembering to use them fluently in the heat of the moment takes experience and practice

  14. 5 months ago
    Anonymous

    without sparring its kind of useless. Its like reading a book about how to ride a bike.

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