How to avoid plateau completely

As someone who has barely started working out, what steps do I take NOW to avoid the so called plateau before it even happens?

Heard too many stories of guys who work out for a year, get rapid "newbie gains", feel great, then can barely make any kinds of gains afterwards and lose all motivation basically.

  1. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    you can't avoid it, most people don't have the genetics for strength sports and stagnate after a few years, never going past that.

  2. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    The only way to avoid is to not lift. Plateauing is a sign you aren't a beginner anymore. It's a good thing. If it demotivates you then you simply do not have enough patience.

  3. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Ear maor

  4. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Realistically you'll probably have given up way before that's a problem

  5. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Either you do everything right already and your plateau will be the natty limit for your genetics or you'll hit it, and it could be caused by dozens of things.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Is there any point in getting a personal trainer to help you reach your natty limit? Or should you only get a trainer to help you go further after the plateau?

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        How retarded are you exactly?

  6. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    You need insane genetics to not plateau after like 2-3 years

  7. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Human breastmilk.

  8. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Where normal people plateau? IST told me everyone should hit 1/2/3/4 easily, but I plateau'd far before that

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      try not being a woman

  9. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Wow, some crappy advice here.
    All a plataeu is is when your body has fully adapted to your current routine and doesn't need to grow to be able to perform the sets you put it through every week.
    It means it's time to change what you're doing, and force your body onto the backfoot so to speak, so it needs to grow to cope with the new strain it is under.
    Once you hit a plateau, don't just carry on grinding out the same set every week and get demoralised, change things. Change the reps, change accessories, do heavy singles. There are more ways to progressively overload than the linear weight progression that noobs can acheive.
    And the people telling you about the 'natty limit' have absolutely no idea. There will be a limit to your progression, but it is unique to your genetics, and will be FAR higher than the losers on here say it is.
    Get that out of your mindset, the limit to your potential is way higher than most people can achieve without total dedication, so it isn't really a barrier you need to worry about.
    I see people on here saying they hit their limit at like 2pl8 bench and stuff which is absolutely laughable, they just hit a baby tier plateau and gave up.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      tl.dr

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Tldr: drinking your own cum will prevent hitting a plateau

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      So you're saying like transition to boxing/muay thai/fighting, or some other sport, once you've hit your gym-set plateau?

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        No, change your gym routine to shock your muscles into further growth.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          shit probably need to go to prison or something to achieve that

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >this
      also take 2 weeks off lifting and do stretching sessions instead

  10. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Deload weights by 10% and increase over two weeks or so to your old weights, try to increase the weights from there again and set new PR's.

    If that doesn't work you need to switch up your routine from beginner to intermediate. No new PR's every workout but from week to week.

    One workout with Higher Volume, followed by a light workout for recovery, followed by one with Intensity for a new PR.

  11. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Consider training in 2-3 month blocks.
    Pick a set of long term goals that'll take 6 months - 1 year each. Such as lift size, physical proportions, cardio achievement, weight etc.
    Pick workouts that dedicate entirely towards that goal. Rotate through these every 2-3 months.
    Move onto the next goal every 6-8 months, cycling through your goals. Each time you get back to your original goal, you will be back where you were but with renewed newbie gains + additional abilities from your training in other areas

    e.g.
    -Greyskull for 3 months (newbie gains strength)
    - pick proportions focus, do nippard's foundations hypertrophy (3 programs over 6 months)
    -Rotate back to strength, do 2 routines back to back
    -Rotate to weightloss, pick up a calisthenics routine + dieting
    -Rotate to cardio, maybe rowing, running, boxing or swimming
    -Rotate back to strength, etc etc

    make sure your foundations are always good though (Sleep, Eat, Technique, Consistency), as they are far far more relevant to success.

    Additionally IF you do for whatever reason plateau despite doing everything right &it bothers you, it's unlikely to be across everything. Simply stop caring about the point that's plateau'd & leave it on maintenance while pushing other things OR simply focus fire the area you're stuck on by incorporating more specific training for the problem area to adapt.

  12. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    It's just coming down of the high of your new gains and expecting progress at the same pace. All you do is not get discouraged.

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