hypertrophy x strength for bjj

i had a talk with my bjj coach last night and he told me to change my lifts in the gym to start training for strength, not hypertrophy.

he said:
>for hypertrophy you get your muscles to failure which could make them easier to rip, and thats not good for a fighter.
but one of my goals for this year is to get a v-taper body (and im noticing my lifts are making my lats wider, just like i planned), should i just give up on becoming aesthetic to focus on bjj performance? is there any way i could get a v-shape while still doing bjj 5 times a week and not risking getting injured easily?

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  1. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    How old are you and how long have you been lifting and how long have you been training bjj?

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      im 20, been lifting for 3 years now and started bjj in november

      >>for hypertrophy you get your muscles to failure which could make them easier to rip, and thats not good for a fighter.
      Sounds moronic. and makes no sense. Becoming bigger will make you a better fighter, and bodybuilding is much much closer to maximizing the general strength of every muscle in your body than trying to increase poundage on some powerlift.

      but wouldnt training for hypertrophy make me more vulnerable to getting injured easily?

      I'd say you're less likely to get injured doing bodybuilding-style training, you work with lower weights for higher volume and accumulate less fatigue in general.
      That said I've combined strongman training with contact sport for the last couple of years and I've been injury free aside from a minor ankle roll the other week.

      i dont understand, what should i do?

      what your coach said is moronic. There is a very very strong correlation with muscle size and strength.

      CNS efficiency (which is why you lift heavy) and muscle size increase are the 2 things that increase your strength. That's why athletes and powerlifters typically have a hypertrophy block of training.

      My recommendation is setting aside 4 months to train for hypertrophy, then find a good strength program next and then start incorporating more and more explosive movements after the strength block.

      And no, training for strength will not noticeably hinder hypertrophy results, especially if you add in a few really good accessories to your main lifts during that strength program.

      so i should keep doing my hypertrophy program for 4 more months before transitioning to a strength one?

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >but wouldnt training for hypertrophy make me more vulnerable to getting injured easily?
        Other way around. Muscles protect you.

        Unless you reach Ronnie Coleman's levels where you can't take your own shirt you'll be fine

  2. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >>for hypertrophy you get your muscles to failure which could make them easier to rip, and thats not good for a fighter.
    Sounds moronic. and makes no sense. Becoming bigger will make you a better fighter, and bodybuilding is much much closer to maximizing the general strength of every muscle in your body than trying to increase poundage on some powerlift.

  3. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I'd say you're less likely to get injured doing bodybuilding-style training, you work with lower weights for higher volume and accumulate less fatigue in general.
    That said I've combined strongman training with contact sport for the last couple of years and I've been injury free aside from a minor ankle roll the other week.

  4. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    what your coach said is moronic. There is a very very strong correlation with muscle size and strength.

    CNS efficiency (which is why you lift heavy) and muscle size increase are the 2 things that increase your strength. That's why athletes and powerlifters typically have a hypertrophy block of training.

    My recommendation is setting aside 4 months to train for hypertrophy, then find a good strength program next and then start incorporating more and more explosive movements after the strength block.

    And no, training for strength will not noticeably hinder hypertrophy results, especially if you add in a few really good accessories to your main lifts during that strength program.

  5. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Why did you save and post some irrelevant picture of thot#9183943??

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      because i cant make a post without a picture

  6. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    No.

  7. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I have been in a BJJ gym to the point of competing and being a coach for a decade and not once have I ever heard something like that

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      That being said, strength training for BJJ has a couple differences because you can find use for hip adductors, more forearms, and more flexibility. You can also use more muscle endurance and hip twisting motions.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        but would training for hypertrophy be bad for me?

  8. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >should i just give up on becoming aesthetic to focus on bjj performance?
    No

    In fact I believe you should ditch bjj and focus solely on gym

  9. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Anon, unless you're planning to earn a living with BJJ competitions just do whatever tbe frick man, it doesn't matter.

  10. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Martial artists really shouldn't lift weights, body weight exercises are better for your training.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Stop saying moronic shit. Lifting is great for grappling.

  11. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    If your goal is V taper then just to pullups and pulldowns. For strength just rows. Seems pretty simple to me.

  12. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Your coach sound moronic. But being charitable, he probably means with hypertrophy your muscle would not be in top shape for your fighting season. And yes, the weeks before a fight you should not be lifting near to failure.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      One full week of recovery is enoigh to be in top shape for a comp.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        For sure, but several weeks before a comp the adaptive resources you put into lifting should be focused on conditioning. Your strength isn't going anywhere.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          Blondes are better than brunettes du ficken mutterficker hurensohn

  13. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    It doesn't really matter. Just make you do a decent amount of back work (basically pull ups, preferably holding a gi and some variation of row) and lots of shoulder and hip health

  14. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    One of those things is long hours doing something in order to trick other people into thinking you didn't waste your time on something completely pointless with no real world application.
    The other thing is getting shredded

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