I can’t afford protein anymore :( It’s over for me.

I can’t afford protein anymore 🙁
It’s over for me.

  1. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    It was over before it even began if you can't afford whey protein powder, eggs and chicken

  2. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    Lol poorfag

  3. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    Not being able to afford food/protein isn't a bad thing

    You will find 99% of the "aesthetics brahs" basically dont eat anything, they just stay lean on low calories and get a pump for photos and look pretty stringy/flat and skinny normally.

    Understand this whole industry is a facade

    You really only need a lot of protein if you're actually trying to be a massive powershitter and weighing a very large weight and need thousands upon thousands of calories a day to maintain the weight you want + protein to keep up the training going properly.

    If you just want to look good, eating a lot of food/protein isn't even a requirement, just be lean and physically active.

    • 4 months ago
      Anonymous

      The TLDR version

      Do you really think the aesthetics brahs eat a lot of protein???? really???? when their calories are so limited? Fuck no. They would NEVER be able to shit eating <1500 calories of protein.

      The reality is aesthetics bros eat like maybe 50-100g protein in 1500 calories.

      >1500 calories??

      yes, thats how you become an aesthetic bro, you dont become aesthetic eating 2500-3000+ calories, thats how you get fat

      • 4 months ago
        Anonymous

        is a TLDR of the TLDR coming?

        • 4 months ago
          Anonymous

          don't eat

          • 4 months ago
            Anonymous

            based

  4. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    I go on Amazon app in my phone and find protein powders with a first time subscribe and save promo, usually I can find a 40% off coupon and then the subscribe and save adds another 5% off.

    After I the first order I just immediately cancel so I won’t get randomly charged for it in the future and just enjoy my protein powder at near half off

  5. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    Buy one of these instead of gay onions protein powder

    • 4 months ago
      Anonymous

      Eggs are $5 for 15 now where I live. Only cheap source of protein is lentils currently.

      • 4 months ago
        Anonymous

        Lentils, beans, oats and chickpeas are Gods' blessings.

      • 4 months ago
        Anonymous

        cottage cheese, yogurt

        Make up other amino deficiencies with the lentils and grains

        • 4 months ago
          Anonymous

          >cheese, yoghurt
          >amino acid deficiencies
          Lmao. Lol, even.

          • 4 months ago
            Anonymous

            That picture is a little misleading, especially in regards to collagen.

            Collagen is high in the proteins not found in muscle meats, and since muscle meats are the primary animal protein we eat, collagen is very valuable to round out your aminos.

            • 4 months ago
              Anonymous

              Sure, but the purpose of PDCAAS and DIAAS is to rank protein sources in terms of their supply of all essential amino acids.
              Collagen has no tryptophan whatsoever, and very little methionine so it ranks zero.
              Even poor quality plant protein sources have enough of these essential amino acids to prevent acute deficiency in people that derive the bulk of their protein from said sources.
              Most ground meats contain significant proportions of connective tissue, and as such give the best of both worlds, having adequate tryptophan + methionine as well as hydroxyproline from collagen.

              • 4 months ago
                Anonymous

                glycine is found in small amounts in muscle meats.

                tryptophan and methionine are found in muscle meats.

                Glycine has numerous benefits for the joints / skin / hair / digestive system

                I think that protein digestibility chart is a little misleading. Actually, the healthiest protein on that is shown as the least important, especially in regards to modern diets.

              • 4 months ago
                Anonymous

                >tryptophan and methionine are found in muscle meats.
                Did I dispute this?
                Like I said, most ground/minced meats have a fairly high amount of connective tissue and so if you eat ground beef instead of say, steak, you're getting a significant source of collagen in your diet anyway.

              • 4 months ago
                Anonymous

                >ground beef instead of say, steak, you're getting a significant source of collagen in your diet anyway

                No, you are not. A diet consisting of 150 grams of protein from steak alone would give you about 16.5 grams of glycine. Most people can't afford to eat steak as their primary source of protein.

                methionine depletes glycine, which means every gram of methionine you consume, you need to consume an extra .5-1g of glycine.

              • 4 months ago
                Anonymous

                Are you actually retarded? Is English your second language?
                I wasn't recommending people eat steak, I was recommending they eat cheaper ground beef due to its higher collagen content.
                In the UK, ground beef labelled "lean" is up to 12% collagen and regular ground beef is up to 15% collagen. Consuming 150g of protein from ground beef (around 750g of meat) would therefore consist of up to 112g of collagen, of which around 23g would be glycine.

              • 4 months ago
                Anonymous

                that is 1914 calories from cheap ground beef. At 26.5 ounces of ground beef, you are looking at about $8 a day just for ground beef. Most people can't afford this.

                Collagen levels in the mince at retail ranged from 1·4% to 4·4% (1·5% to 5·1% on a wet fat-free basis).

                https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/22055219/

                I would love for you to post your sources, since you aren't retarded.

              • 4 months ago
                Anonymous

                >that is 1914 calories from cheap ground beef.
                I used the same arbitrary protein level that you gave here. I wasn't recommending people eat that much ground beef, I was making a comparison to the figure you stated.

                >ground beef instead of say, steak, you're getting a significant source of collagen in your diet anyway

                No, you are not. A diet consisting of 150 grams of protein from steak alone would give you about 16.5 grams of glycine. Most people can't afford to eat steak as their primary source of protein.

                methionine depletes glycine, which means every gram of methionine you consume, you need to consume an extra .5-1g of glycine.

                >diet consisting of 150 grams of protein from steak alone
                >Collagen levels in the mince at retail ranged from 1·4% to 4·4% (1·5% to 5·1% on a wet fat-free basis).
                From ground beef purchased in one geographical area nearly 40 years ago.
                It's a moot point anyway, because glycine is not an essential amino acid. Your body produces it endogenously.
                Why do you have such a boner for collagen? How much money have you spent on collagen supplements?

              • 4 months ago
                Anonymous

                Perhaps you don't understand what I am saying when I bring up that 150g figure. I am saying that you need to consume an exorbitant amount of muscle meat to consume enough glycine, which refutes what you say that you can get enough collagen from muscle meats. Do you not understand how arguments work? I would also like for you to cite your sources stating that muscle meat is 12-15% collagen.

                It goes to what I said earlier. We eat a lot of protein from muscle meats and we don't eat a lot of connective tissues. To round out aminos, it is therefore intelligent to consume connective tissue proteins.

                The body does not endogenously produce enough glycine to reap the full benefits from it, I wish you actually knew about the context of the information you are spewing. What is required to live is not the same as what is optimal for health. 56 grams of protein is what is the daily requirement for males. You need to understand that when we have studies showing how the body adapts to malnutrition that these studies show what goes on acutely, not what happens chronically.

              • 4 months ago
                Anonymous

                >I would also like for you to cite your sources stating that muscle meat is 12-15% collagen.
                I never said muscle meat is 12-15% collagen. I said that UK allows ground beef mince to contain up to 12-15% collagen depending on whether it is labelled as "lean" or not.
                "minced beef" is not synonymous with "muscle meat". Steak mince would be, but I didn't say steak mince, I said ground/minced beef.
                https://www.gov.uk/government/news/shoppers-to-make-more-informed-choices-on-minced-meat
                >The body does not endogenously produce enough glycine to reap the full benefits from it
                I'm sure you've got a source for that too?

              • 4 months ago
                Anonymous

                your link doesn't work.

                >I'm sure you've got a source for that too?
                Supplementation with increasing amounts of gelatin increased circulating glycine, proline, hydroxyproline, and hydroxylysine, peaking 1 h after the supplement was given. Engineered ligaments treated for 6 d with serum from samples collected before or 1 h after subjects consumed a placebo or 5 or 15 g gelatin showed increased collagen content and improved mechanics. Subjects who took 15 g gelatin 1 h before exercise showed double the amino-terminal propeptide of collagen I in their blood, indicating increased collagen synthesis.

                Findings from these engineered tissues that the presence of ascorbic acid (vitamin C) and the amino acid proline can increase collagen production and engineered ligament mechanics (21) together with work by Vieira and colleagues (29), who showed that increasing glycine intake improves the mechanics of Achilles tendons after injury, suggest that a nutritional intervention that increases amino acid components of collagen and the cofactor vitamin C may improve collagen synthesis.

                As a result of this background, in the current study we used a randomized, crossover-design protocol to test the hypothesis that consuming gelatin (a food derivative of collagen) and vitamin C combined with exercise could increase collagen synthesis.

                https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5183725/

                If you conduct a study on a supplement, and there is a benefit from that supplementation, that means that endogenous production of that supplement is inadequate for optimal health. This is very basic logic.

              • 4 months ago
                Anonymous

                Works on my machine.

              • 4 months ago
                Anonymous

                and then it goes back to what you said, in that you'd have to consume 750g of it to meet 150g of daily protein intake of which 23 would be glycine, but you forgot to mention the methionine content would offset some of the glycine. Not to mention the cost of such a diet, both on health and on the wallet.

                Just from your sources alone I can prove that the glycine content in your meat is not adequate enough to get the amounts that are studied for the benefits.

              • 4 months ago
                Anonymous

                Why would you buy ground meat? Like just grind it from recognizable cuts lmao

              • 4 months ago
                Anonymous

                Cheap AF and the extra collagen in ground meats is beneficial.

              • 4 months ago
                Anonymous

                Anon there is collagen in every cut you would choose to grind. I generally buy whole briskets and freeze them in two pound sections. Then I take them out and cut them into chunks or grind them into mince. The added benefit is cutting off the huge sections of fat, grinding those, and then rendering that into cooking tallow. When you buy meat already minced you're usually paying the same price for scraps of off cuts as you would a slow roasting/braising cut like chuck or brisket.

              • 4 months ago
                Anonymous

                >Maltodextrin (Polyjoule) was used to weight- and calorie-match the placebo and gelatin treatments.
                So the group doses with a protein source showed a greater rate of protein synthesis? How shocking.
                Why didn't this studies use a placebo of isocaloric non-glycine protein supplentation?
                It's a good study, but the control/placebo should have been an alternative protein source, not sugar. The benefits of the collagen supplementation might have been seen with any protein supplementation.

              • 4 months ago
                Anonymous

                >Supplementation with increasing amounts of gelatin increased circulating glycine, proline, hydroxyproline, and hydroxylysine, peaking 1 h after the supplement was given.

                Perhaps you should read this again. You should also put it in context the massive amount of non connective tissue protein they would need to consume to reach the equivalent of 15 grams of gelatin.

              • 4 months ago
                Anonymous

                The study doesn't prove that gelatin gave specific benefits over other protein sources, they compared it to a sugar placebo. It's possible that dosing with isocaloric non-gelatine protein sources would have spurred endogenous synthesis of the necessary amino acids for collagen synthesis seen in this study.
                Like I said, it's a good study but it's still flawed.
                I'm not arguing that collagen can't be beneficial, only that it isn't necessary.

              • 4 months ago
                Anonymous

                >The study doesn't prove that gelatin gave specific benefits over other protein sources, they compared it to a sugar placebo

                Except that it does. The rate of benefit increased with the rate of supplementation. 15 grams of gelatin is 50 calories, you simply cannot compare that with any alternative protein source while also trying to match glycine content. Since it would take about 5-6 scoops of protein powder to match the gelatin content, you would be about 450-500 calories above what the gelatin group was getting. It is impossible to do what you are asking. Moreover, the devil is also in the details, 15 grams of gelatin translates to about 13 grams of extra protein intake, which is not enough of a difference to be that significant from eating sugar. The composition of that protein matters more than the protein itself. You're just not understanding the study much.

                Also protein synthesis is very different from collagen synthesis.

              • 4 months ago
                Anonymous

                >The rate of benefit increased with the rate of supplementation. 15 grams of gelatin is 50 calories, you simply cannot compare that with any alternative protein source while also trying to match glycine content. S
                Sure but they didn't compare it to alternative protein sources! Other protein sources may have shown a similar dose-dependent benefit to collagen synthesis.
                This study proves that glycine supplementation in the form of gelatin is beneficial, but it doesn't prove that it's significantly superior to other protein sources because they only compared it to sugar supplementation.

              • 4 months ago
                Anonymous

                >This study proves that glycine supplementation in the form of gelatin is beneficial, but it doesn't prove that it's significantly superior to other protein sources because they only compared it to sugar supplementation.

                Except that it does. No other protein has the composition of aminos that gelatin does.

                Again, the amount that they consumed is a negligible amount of protein that would not have significant physiological effects on anyone. 13-14 grams of protein supplementation does not translate to much. What makes it even worse is the composition of that protein. That protein will have very negligible amounts of connective tissue proteins in it.

                What makes the point drive home is that they showed such a significant amount of collagen synthesis utilizing so little protein, 5g of gelatin is about 4g of protein. This alone shows the benefit of supplementing gelatin over protein. I really don't understand what your argument is.

                You are just wrong. There is no other way to say it. You don't understand the underlying physiology and you don't understand what the study is showing.

              • 4 months ago
                Anonymous

                >Except that it does. No other protein has the composition of aminos that gelatin does.
                Doesn't matter. Any other protein source would have provided amino acids that the body can endogenously convert into those needed for collagen synthesis.
                You don't understand the null hypothesis.
                It's entirely possible that any protein source, any protein supplementation delivered in the same form and with the same dose of vitamin C, would have shown the same benefits to collagen synthesis.
                Frame it another way.
                "In this crossover study, subjects completed an exercise protocol (rope skipping) with or without protein supplementation. Protein supplementation resulted in increased collagen (protein) synthesis compared to placebo"

              • 4 months ago
                Anonymous

                >Any other protein source would have provided amino acids that the body can endogenously convert into those needed for collagen synthesis.

                Provided that the dose was appropriate, which means that the subjects would have had to consume 450-500 calories more than the gelatin group.

                Substance A has very little of substance B in it

                Substance C has a lot of substance B in it

                If we take substance B and show that it has dose dependent benefits, it will take a lot more of substance A to get the same amount of benefits since substance A has very little B in it. If we take equal doses of substance A and C, substance C will be superior in regards to the benefits related to substance B.

                You really don't understand what you're talking about. I can't believe you are this retarded.

              • 4 months ago
                Anonymous

                Every amino acid in gelatin can by synthesised in the body. The dose dependent benefits of glycine were not compared against similar doses of any other amino acids that the body may use to synthesise it. The body can use three other amino acids, serine, threonine and choline to synthesise glycine. These amino acids are found in high amounts in virtually all animal protein sources.

                There was no "substance A" in the study you posted. They only compared glycine supplementation to sugar supplementation.

              • 4 months ago
                Anonymous

                If the body can synthesize these aminos, then the control group would have had benefits. If endogenous production is adequate, there would have been no change between the two groups.

                >The body can use three other amino acids, serine, threonine and choline to synthesise glycine. These amino acids are found in high amounts in virtually all animal protein sources.

                You need to obtain more knowledge about this process and what it costs the body. You will then understand that an extra 4-14g of protein would not translate to increased collagen production as is shown with 5g-15g of gelatin supplementation.

                Again, you're just wrong because you lack the underlying knowledge.

              • 4 months ago
                Anonymous

                >If the body can synthesize these aminos, then the control group would have had benefits. If endogenous production is adequate, there would have been no change between the two groups.
                But the "control" group was not supplemented with protein of any kind, only sugar. Protein supplementation before and after exercise is known to stimulate protein synthesis compared to no protein.
                >body needs amino acid X for protein Y
                >eat protein A containing amino acid B
                >amino acid B can be used to endogenously synthesise amino acid X
                >protein Y synthesis is boosted
                >You will then understand that an extra 4-14g of protein would not translate to increased collagen production
                Your study doesn't demonstrate this because they didn't test it. They only tested gelatin vs sugar.

              • 4 months ago
                Anonymous

                https://www.cresca.upc.edu/sites/default/files/docs/Connective%20Tissue%20in%20Beefburguers.pdf

              • 4 months ago
                Anonymous

                https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5855430/

                Also glycine is the limiting factor in glutathione production, which is the strongest antioxidant in the human body

      • 4 months ago
        Anonymous

        get some chickens fucking retardo

        • 4 months ago
          Anonymous

          My gf is scared of large birds

          • 4 months ago
            Anonymous

            I reccomend getting rhode island reds. They aren't that big nor are they aggressive. Lay hella lot of eggs too.

  6. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    What don't you understand about great reset, you are going to die

  7. 4 months ago
    Anonymous
  8. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    just drink a lot of milk and eat eggs

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