I don't feel my muscles at all when I train, just a slight pump after the exercise, but not very strong.

I don't feel my muscles at all when I train, just a slight pump after the exercise, but not very strong. Some people told me it might be due to poor MMC. What do you think?

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  1. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Can you flex your tittys individually?

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      My tittys? No

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Get to the point that you can do the titty dance and then see if working out feels better.

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          With this you shouldn't conceptualize "feeling your muscles" like you would feel a heart attack, a knot, a bruise, or a cut.
          It's much more subtle, and the easiest way I feel it is actually by feeling the movement that happens when I flex without a load.
          Which is why I brought up the titty dance.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      I can but only because I have alot of chest fat

  2. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    not entirely sure what you mean by not feeling them when exercising. the only time i never really felt anything during an exercise usually meant i was using incorrect form or not using enough weight.
    what kind of exercises are you doing?

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      I do the classic exercises: squat, bench Press, pull-ups, dips. I do different rows for the back (barbell rows and vertical pull), I do chest press and pec fly for the chest, and for the arms, I have tried all possible curls. The only times I really feel my muscles working is on the leg machines during leg curls and leg extensions. But for the upper body sessions, I don't feel anything DURING the exercise, only a slight pump at the end (and even then, my pump sensations vary greatly from one session to another).

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        only thing i can suggest is maybe increasing the weight or range of motion. i never felt anything with bench press till i swapped to dumbbells and lowered my arms further before pushing them up

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Actually, for a long time I thought (because people told me) that the problem must surely lie in my poor form and range of motion. But I've been supervised by many friends of mine (including one who was a gym coach) who tell me that my movement is even better than theirs, especially in terms of range of motion for pull-ups, where I fully extend my arms in the negative phase and bring my head above the bar in the positive phase. For the bench press, I think I have an unfavorable morphology (long forearms, especially compared to my humerus, and a small chest) and I struggle to increase weight on this exercise (I'm at 65kg after 2 years of weight training). Yet I make sure that the bar touches my chest to be sure not to cheat on the range of motion. My friends have told me that I'm so obsessed with execution that I don't know how to cheat on the movement, so there's nothing I need to change, I just need to persevere. But on the other hand, people say that feeling your muscles is crucial, and if you don't feel anything it's a bad sign... I don't know what to think anymore!

          • 2 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            that is strange. are you still making progress? if you are, perhaps it does not matter

            • 2 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              Hard to say... My progress is there, but it is very slow, even completely stagnant on some exercises like the military press or the inclined curl. For the bench press, I manage to gain one repetition per session at most; I’ve been struggling with this exercise since I started. As for legs and back, I feel I’m making good progress, but people are often surprised by the gap between my back performance, which is starting to be decent, and the lack of visible results, which haven't changed at all since the beginning

          • 2 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Make sure your bench form is dialed man. I was plateauing hard at 175lbs for reps, I decided to form check back to the basics and really tuck in my scapula and use my lats to help support the weight, lil bit of arch, good foot placement for leg drive and I hit 185x8. Within a couple weeks I hit 205x2 (pr) and 225x2 the set after

            >6'2 180lbs lanky ass build

            • 2 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              My bench has already been checked several times. Today I hit the gym and went from 8-7-6-5 to 8-8-8-7, I went to failure on the last set and had to roll the bar until the ground to survive lmao.

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >except leg curls and leg extensions
        lol me too.
        Don't worry, you'll still get gains.
        How is your cardio btw?

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Shitty cardio I guess, is it important for MMC?

  3. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Probably not enough intensity. Are you going to failure? And on every set? Try one day just doing super high volume like 10x10 bench. Every set to failure. If you don't "feel it" after that you have an intensity problem. You have to learn to actually push. Do everything with safeties so you don't have to worry about failure.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      I go to failure on all exercises except the bench press and squat because I've been advised against doing so (high risk of injury). I'm from France, and the predominant doctrine in the French lifting world for a long time was to go to failure on every exercise and every set. However, in recent years, this approach has been discouraged. The goal now is to "save energy" during the initial sets to give your all in the last sets to achieve a specific format, for example, 4x10, 4x12, etc.

      Obviously, if you aim to complete 4 sets of 10 reps for an exercise and you manage to do 10 reps on the 4th set, it means the first set where you did 10 reps was too easy, and you still had some energy left. This is the main training principle recommended for beginners in our understanding of progressive overload. I'm not sure if it's the same in the United States, but this is my response to your question about failure.

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Yeah its safer because if you do 4x10, 10 reps each, you're essentially doing 3 warmup sets until you actually get close to your limit. Then you're just doing 1 actual set. Yeah you probably shouldn't go literally to failure but you could do with 1 or 0 reps left, so they're all still clean. Either do every set like that or add more sets after the warmups. You could also increase frequency, if you're only doing a muscle 1x a week, you're basically doing 1 real set a week, so you could do 2x, 3x or more a week.

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          It depends on the exercises. For example, I'm currently trying to achieve 4x8 at 65kg on the bench press. My current performance is 8-8-7-6, and I think that even on the first set, I don't have much more than 8 reps in me.

          • 2 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            I'm talking about though if you did something like all 7 reps. The first two sets aren't doing as much. But I think most people usually have larger drops offs, especially after the first set, so its a bigger difference. They're basically only getting to their limit near the last sets, rather than getting their right off the bat and then doing it multiple times.

            • 2 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              The goal is to be above a certain threshold for each of the 4 sets (for example, 5 repetitions per set if the format is 4x8) without ever exceeding 8 reps to avoid burning out. For instance, I might be able to do 9 reps in my first set, but I would use more energy, which might mean I drop below the threshold of 5 reps in my 4th set. Instead of having 8-8-7-6 like I currently do, I might end up with 9-7-6-4 (just a random example). This means I might put more intensity into my first set but tire myself out too much to stay above the 5-rep threshold in my 4th set, which is poor programming (according to the idea I see being promoted on the internet in French forums).

              Moreover, if the goal is to go to failure in every set, then this whole idea of programming in 4x10 or 4x8 doesn't make much sense. The first set will always be more performant than the last, and there will always be a performance drop-off.

              • 2 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                If you go below 5, either start off with lighter weight, or you can do a "down set," where you drop the weight for that set so you get above 5 again.

                >The goal is to be above a certain threshold for each of the 4 sets (for example, 5 repetitions per set if the format is 4x8) without ever exceeding 8 reps to avoid burning out
                The entire point though is "burning out," that's when you really fatigue the strength part of the muscle. you are complaining about not feeling anything. If you do enough sets to failure it is near impossible not to feel it.

                Just doing all the same reps is fine for beginners, or for muscular endurance / athleticism. But if you are stalling out on strength, maybe its because you're not doing enough sets to near failure. right now it sounds like you're just doing 1.

              • 2 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                >If you go below 5, either start off with lighter weight, or you can do a "down set," where you drop the weight for that set so you get above 5 again.

                Yes, don't worry I use lighter weight when it happens!

                > Just doing all the same reps is fine for beginners, or for muscular endurance / athleticism. But if you are stalling out on strength, maybe its because you're not doing enough sets to near failure. right now it sounds like you're just doing 1.

                From the moment I'm not hitting the maximum number of repetitions imposed by the format in a set, we can be sure that it's a working set where I've really pushed to the limit. If I do 8-7-6-5, it means that in the second set, I judged that I couldn't do the 8th rep. Maybe my judgment is incorrect, and that's an inherent risk of the practice, but I'd rather not attempt it on the bench press because it's a risky exercise. For all other exercises, because that's the principle of formats like 4x10, except when using a new weight (i.e., when I've just validated the immediately preceding weight), the first set is always completed successfully, and it's the subsequent sets that pose a problem and that I take to failure

              • 2 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                then do a ridiculous amounts of sets. Like add 1-2 sets every workout. If you get to like 20+ sets a week and you still aren't feeling it, you aren't pushing yourself. Type to get amped up or take a lot of caffeine or something. You could add safeties like bench in a power rack or add machine sets after your compound lifts.

            • 2 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              Regarding this whole comversation about sets and failure which I've only skimmed
              -I can usually go to failure 4 sets in a row and only lose 10-20% of reps. Like 13 13 11 11.
              -Even people who know it's hard to know how far you are from failure get it wrong. I thought I was going to fail a rep and decided to just keep pushing and did like 4 more. About 18 when I thought I was failing at 14.
              -If you always go to true failure you can't lose. You migiht not get 100% of your potential, but 98%, and everyone who THINKS they're 1 rep from failure is only getting 90%. (Except shit like squat and deadlift where you get snapped if you fail.)

              • 2 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                >-I can usually go to failure 4 sets in a row and only lose 10-20% of reps. Like 13 13 11 11.

                This means to me you have a good nervous system

                > -Even people who know it's hard to know how far you are from failure get it wrong. I thought I was going to fail a rep and decided to just keep pushing and did like 4 more. About 18 when I thought I was failing at 14.

                Depends on the exercise, I think now I know myself, I've been benching for 2 years, it's one of the few exercises I've been doing since I have started lifting and it doesn't seem really difficult to me to know whether the next rep is gonna lead you to failure. For all other exercises (except squat as I said), I go to failure without trying to anticipate anything, because I don't see any risk of injury.

              • 2 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                >This means to me you have a good nervous system
                Aw thanks heh. I also wait a long time between sets, 2.5+minutes for major compounds.

              • 2 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                I wait more than that haha, usually between 3 and 4 minutes, my online coach told me I'm the type of guy who can do a lot but in a few sets, and advised me to do less sets per exercise (maybe going down from 4 to 3)

              • 2 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                thats not enough volume

              • 2 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                3 per exercise isn't enough, period? It's like the standard and some do 2 or even 1. I try to do 4 for compounds because I think I'm resistant to growth.

              • 2 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                for hypertrophy?? 1 fricking set
                hello?

              • 2 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                Are you the same homosexual who acted like approaching women meant asking to eat them out the other day? Only so many people can be so stupid and still operate a keyboard.

                1 set per muscle actually works for hypertrophy unless you're years into it, and each additional set is diminishing returns. But that's not optimal, and of course I was referring to one set per exercise, not muscle, and many people do several different exercises, often only one set for some of them. Frick off.

              • 2 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                yes ofc 1 set per exercice thats fricking moronic

              • 2 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                Doing 1 set each of 4 tricep exercises is fundamentally not worse than doing 4 sets of 1 exercise, and in most cases it's better. If you disagree please explain why
                >1x15 ez bar skullcrusher
                >1x15 rope pushdown
                >1x15 straight bar pushdown
                >1x15 standing dumbbell tricep extension
                is always worse than
                >4x15 standing dumbbell tricep extension.

              • 2 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                why the frick would you do 5 different exercices
                is the goal here to make it the most complicated routine ever? nerd

              • 2 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                4 not 5. Count much, Idiot? Probably not, so stop arguing about fricking numbers.

              • 2 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                still why do 4 different exercices instead of 4 sets of the same exercice
                homie you went full moron xD

              • 2 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                Red herring, you attacked my claim that 1 set per EXERCISE was done.
                >for hypertrophy?? 1 fricking set
                hello?
                1 set per 4 exercises works just as well as 4 sets per 1 exercise, and usually better.

                And if you have a home gym, there isn't even any fricking benefit to sticking to one exercise, like holding onto the machine.

              • 2 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                of course i understood it has 1 set for the whole workout

              • 2 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                >ofc 1 set per exercice thats fricking moronic

                of course i understood it has 1 set for the whole workout

                That you? Don't move the goalposts just frick off. No one said anything like "Just go to the gym and do 1 set and that's good enough!"

              • 2 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                > 1 set works actually works.

                No it fricking doesn't unless you are on steroids and like Mentzer did warm up sets prior to bringing one set to failure which you homosexuals seem to fail to understand, it would be better to do 2 training sessions a week where you have 1 exercise dedicated to 1 muscle group and you do each to failure, this could be done such as Push/Pull/Legs routine with only one exercise per target muscle group x2 a week to get maximum results and a complete rest week after maybe 6 months of training.

              • 2 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                I didn't imply in any way that I meant 1 set per week. I do think 1 set per day, twice a week, will build muscle for a year, if you do it right. The studies that compare 1 set to 2 sets to 3 sets don't show THAT much difference. The thing is 2 is better than 1 and 3 is better than 2 so no one does 1, which I already said:
                >But that's not optimal

              • 2 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                Your body can recover from muscular fatigue in ONE full day, so he's bullshitting you.

              • 2 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                Mine can't. I do PPLPPLX and I still need deload every 6 weeks.

          • 2 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            4x8 isnt great for strength id try doing a couple of weeks of heavy 3x5 try it out next time if you can get 65kg 4x8 you should be able to hit 75kg for that. Im on a PPL power/hypertrophy split and the heavy days are fun and i can cheat then i really focus on form with the hypertrophy days.

  4. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Have you had an head injury in the past?

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Not at all, why?

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        There's actually a section in the brain dedicated specifically to that mind muscle connection. Damaging that would make all the unconscious shit that goes into existing impossible so you have to consciously do everything.
        It's not impossible to deal with but it's obviously much harder.

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Yes that's what i was hinting at

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          >There's actually a section in the brain dedicated specifically to that mind muscle connection. Damaging that would make all the unconscious shit that goes into existing impossible so you have to consciously do everything.
          >It's not impossible to deal with but it's obviously much harder.
          Which section is it? I'm pretty interested by what you're elaborating!

          • 2 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Sorry I don't know, i'm not into science I prefer mysticism.

  5. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    You have to learn to focus on it, isometric holds at the end of reps helps.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      I followed a workout routine specifically focused on improving the mind-muscle connection for 4 months from September to December last year, with an online coach who instructed me to use lighter weights and break down the movement into all its phases. I managed to achieve the breakthrough ONCE on the bench press, feeling my chest muscles burn on each repetition, but I couldn't replicate this success at other times. For other muscle groups, it was a flatline.

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        lmao your muscles aren't supposed to burn on each reps
        what kind of bullshit coaching is that

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          At least I could feel them, maybe "burn" is not the appropriate word

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Best way to do it with bench press is to focus on the moment its close to your breasts and going up and holding it there and at full lock out at top. Those are my tips.

  6. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    MMC is a meme. Just focus on good technique and loading the muscle enough.

  7. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Do the exercise low and slow while focusing on the muscle groups. After the second set I can usually feel it. I could use my whole body to help with every lift, but focusing in on the specific muscle instead of the joint was what helped me.
    Going to the gym super late at night and doing a small pull of a sativa cart also helped, but YMMV.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      It's exactly what I've been doing from September to December 2023, but it wasn't very successful. I could sometimes feel my muscles but it was very exercise-dependant and also session-dependant (from one week to another the sensations could appear or disappear without any particular reason). As I said, I once managed to feel my chest while benching but it was only once and I could not reproduce this achievement.

      I don't think I have a particular disease, nor some problem in the brain caused by a past hit in the head. All converges to the explanation of a very poor MMC. I can feel sometimes, but very rarely and the feeling is very volatile and/or small. I'm not like "omg it's burning a lot I can't handle the stress of it anymore!!".

  8. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Yeah you have shitty mmc. Just concentrate on the lifts more and it will improve in no time

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      On the other hand, some told me to lighten the weights I use to work on MMC, what should I do?

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Just keep doing what you are doing but thinking about the muscle you sre contracting during the process. Try to feel what's going on. It's like manual breathing. You need to lift "manually "

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          I see, thanks for the tip

  9. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    drop the weight, improve your form, do higher rep sets

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      I could not improve the form I think

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