I need your help

I suffer from ptsd after serving in the army. I have panic attacks that cause me to sweat profusely in certain situations, and it’s ruining my fricking life. I’ve tried everything: praying, abstinence, cognitive therapy, talking to a therapist, etc. and nothing is working for me. Im at the point where Im about to talk to my php and request a prescription of xanax. I swear to God, I just dont know what else to do. In that light, Im curious to know what you guys think. Despite the avalanche of stupidity here, this is still a good place to get no bs assessments on certain things, and I think this is one of them. So what do you guys think? Let me fricking have it.

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  1. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Have you tried going to a Vets group and talking about it? For some reason most vets refuse to do that

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Thanks for the response, I have talked to the VA. They’re the ones who diagnosed me and awarded me a 30% disability. Unfortunately, the talks and congnitive therapy haven’t worked. And this is despite 100% commitment to trying to make it work. I’m being honest, I stopped ALL vices and focused on cognitive defusion relentlessly and it hasn’t stopped my panic attacks and sweating.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Have you heard what Jordan B Peterson says about PTSD?

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Idk if this will help but I’ve been beating panic attacks basically all of my 20s. I had cptsd (the pussy civilian version). Just a handful of especially fricked up experiences that made me become afraid of my own shadow and have daily panic attacks. I’ll spare the details but I could write 5 max character count posts about it, it’s worst possible scenario type of shit.

        Here’s how I started fixing it
        >The info
        It’s no different than lifting. Progressive overload, start small. You wouldn’t try to bench 315 or run a marathon on day one. This is no different. Exposure and progressive overload starting with the easiest thing you can handle.
        >Step one
        I did baby mode. I started by going to the grocery store, walking in, walking for 1 minute, and then leaving. The next week I did this at peak hours. The next I bought something. I did this daily until I was smiling and nodding at randoms and asking for help from employees and even spending an extra 10 minutes just walking around in the crowd. Yes this part is more so for social anxiety but stick with me.
        >step two
        Challenge yourself more. I got into some vocational classes that entailed me shadowing an actual employee. I utilized step 3 during this, which you may want to skip to tbqh. Then I got a job, also utilized step 3. That job really tested me I experienced all the things that fricked me up there. It was in the hood in a grocery store parking lot interacting with hundreds of people a day outside right off a busy highway exit. I had knives pulled, had nigs threaten to shoot me and the employees working under me, had b***hes hitting on me, had all kinds of random bullshit happening every day there. I worked my way up to here. This was a first 225lb bench if I had to start at the bar if that makes sense.
        1/2 step 3 next post

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Thanks for the response, I have talked to the VA. They’re the ones who diagnosed me and awarded me a 30% disability. Unfortunately, the talks and congnitive therapy haven’t worked. And this is despite 100% commitment to trying to make it work. I’m being honest, I stopped ALL vices and focused on cognitive defusion relentlessly and it hasn’t stopped my panic attacks and sweating.

          2/2
          >step 3
          Talk over this idea with your therapist. I started with xanax changed to beta blockers (propranolol). Essentially you plan to take xanax or a beta blocker when you have to do something that triggers the panic attacks. Then, soon after, the next time without the drug. This is subject to being revised which I recommend based on each individual you know yourself the best, but my protocol was sort of like
          Day 1 xanax 1mg
          Day 2 no Xanax
          Day 3 .75mg
          Next week,
          Day 4 1mg xanax
          Day 5 0.25mg xanax
          Day 6 no Xanax
          And so on until none at all. That helped a bit but when I did it again with beta blockers it was crazy how much it helped. Beta blockers was literally 1-2x and then I never really felt that much anxiety in that setting again. Sort of exposure training wheels. I can now interview with no problems for example when previously I would have broken down in a massive sweat with blurred vision and a 180+ bpm.
          My theory: beta blockers shuts off adrenaline, puts you in a mindset where you can in the heat of the moment challenge and over come the anxiety and in real time do introspection and realize “Im not in danger” and also teaches your brain “hey, fight or flight was never beneficial in these settings. It was actually worse for me. I’m doing better and I’m actually MORE SAFE not being in fight or flight”. I theorize if you’re having panic attacks you get caught in a negative learning loop where your brain believes “we went into fight or flight & lived so clearly it’s beneficial and I need to keep doing that to this poor homie, I need to do it more and at random times just to be safe” whereas having more experiences without fight or flight will teach the opposite. And beta blockers stop fight or flight physical symptoms, while also letting you explore the mental anxiety. Discuss with your therapist, draft your own protocol and plan for it to end with not needing the drug

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            thank you bro a lot of this resonates with me.

            • 3 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              No problem man. I hope it works out for you. I don’t need the beta blockers too often anymore. I’m still working on this but what I’ve found is 1-2 times for a thing that normally puts me into a panic attack and I never need it again for that. I hope it works for you the same way

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Idk if this will help but I’ve been beating panic attacks basically all of my 20s. I had cptsd (the pussy civilian version). Just a handful of especially fricked up experiences that made me become afraid of my own shadow and have daily panic attacks. I’ll spare the details but I could write 5 max character count posts about it, it’s worst possible scenario type of shit.

            Here’s how I started fixing it
            >The info
            It’s no different than lifting. Progressive overload, start small. You wouldn’t try to bench 315 or run a marathon on day one. This is no different. Exposure and progressive overload starting with the easiest thing you can handle.
            >Step one
            I did baby mode. I started by going to the grocery store, walking in, walking for 1 minute, and then leaving. The next week I did this at peak hours. The next I bought something. I did this daily until I was smiling and nodding at randoms and asking for help from employees and even spending an extra 10 minutes just walking around in the crowd. Yes this part is more so for social anxiety but stick with me.
            >step two
            Challenge yourself more. I got into some vocational classes that entailed me shadowing an actual employee. I utilized step 3 during this, which you may want to skip to tbqh. Then I got a job, also utilized step 3. That job really tested me I experienced all the things that fricked me up there. It was in the hood in a grocery store parking lot interacting with hundreds of people a day outside right off a busy highway exit. I had knives pulled, had nigs threaten to shoot me and the employees working under me, had b***hes hitting on me, had all kinds of random bullshit happening every day there. I worked my way up to here. This was a first 225lb bench if I had to start at the bar if that makes sense.
            1/2 step 3 next post

            Thanks for the response, I have talked to the VA. They’re the ones who diagnosed me and awarded me a 30% disability. Unfortunately, the talks and congnitive therapy haven’t worked. And this is despite 100% commitment to trying to make it work. I’m being honest, I stopped ALL vices and focused on cognitive defusion relentlessly and it hasn’t stopped my panic attacks and sweating.

            The issue is the physical symptoms man. That’s the real problem. They get in the way of being able to make progress and can for many people create that negative feedback loop where your brain/subconscious or whatever the frick believes it was beneficial to have a panic attack. If you can stop the physicla symptoms you can then explore and better understand the mental side to it and truly realize how unnecessary it is. Obviously you know already getting a panic attack while just minding your business doing mundane shit in daily life is unnecessary but with the above you’re able to truly ingrain that. I suck at articulating so sorry if I’m not being clear I guess it’s like if you try to learn boxing off YouTube and you spend a year developing shitty habits and form (having panic attacks where they’re not needed) only a good coach (being in the right head space) will be able to help you unlearn that and become better. I hope that makes sense.
            The more shitty anxiety panic experiences, your brain learns it’s beneficial.
            Have those same experiences without that, hopefully they’re actually good and you feel happy after, your brain starts to learn it’s more beneficial not to panic.

            Idk if this will help idk what you’ve been through but I’m sure it’s worse than how my panic issues were and I hope this helps even if only a little. The shit sucks. No one should be having a full blown adrenaline response about to pass out because someone moved too fast and it reminded you of something shitty form the past. That’s gay. There’s no bear or saber toothed tiger chasing us. No one should feel like that unless the circumstance calls for it.

            • 3 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              You have to really accept and own the physical symptoms that arise. Try living in the now when symptoms come up and endure it. They will go away somehow, it’s your mind playing tricks. Know that you will not die and don’t let the panic snowball. If an episode makes you feel tired and really shitty, don’t punish yourself over it and try to continue your day and talk to a close person(don’t show weakness). For example I’m relaxed when my gf comes over. Or when I work from office I’m in my zone. When I get out I’m always alert and jittery, I had the most insane panic attacks you could imagine but in the last few years
              >went on a business trip
              >found a new gf
              >able to drive freeways while being calm
              >gym is going well

              Just realize you are not alone and it’s all temporary. Oh and another tip on when you get panic try to measure your heart rate. You will think it’s very high but when you see that it’s like 100bpm only it will relax you.

              Good luck. Also if you can avoid some stuff do it, don’t listen to the anons who say you are a beta male because of that.

  2. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Have you looked into trauma release exercises?

  3. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    maybe beta blockers? I have this panic sweat and I have not experienced anything traumatic..

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      OP here, when I was first diagnosed, I was prescribed zoloft and sertraline (an estrogen blocker) that was supposed to stop the sweating, and it worked to a certain degree, but I moved to a diff state and most doctors don’t want to prescribe sertraline for this symptom because it’s not really what it’s made for.

  4. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Google Psychedelics and PTSD, I have hunch taken in the right place with the right people might be beneficial

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Psychedelic assisted therapy, look into it

  5. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    emdr worked for me. No longer have to barricade myself in to sleep but it's kind of subtle at first.

  6. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    you have been changed. Nothing will make you go back to the way you were before... The only thing that will happen, with time, is that you learn to live with this new version of yourself.

  7. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Find edsmanifesto
    Look into him. Watch his videos

  8. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    if your panic attacks truly come out of nowhere and your physical symptoms are debilitating to the point where they're disrupting your function you really need medication. CBT techniques and even dialectical behavioral therapy techniques can help, but your body is having a physiological response and when it undergoes that with ptsd it needs to be regulated so you have the mental fortitude to actually be able to put your mental exercises in place to calm yourself down. if you're on track to get a prescription already i'd say you're doing the right thing. just know if you end up with xanax make sure you only take it as prescribed since you wanna be really careful with benzos. beta blockers might be worth looking into as well. i've had social anxiety over the years and they helped me with that.

    not sure if this helps, but i had a roommate in college with bad ptsd and i told him whenever he started feeling panic attack symptoms come up to just call me. he was usually a texter so i knew if i got a call from him seemingly randomly i'd know what was up. if you know someone like that that you trust really well, sometimes just having someone else talking to you can help center your headspace and get you out of a panic attack thought spiral. if you wanna try that just make sure it's someone you trust and knows your situation well. usually i'd just get him talking about literally anything else other than what was immediately happening around him and that was enough to at least get him calmed down a bit so he knew he could take it from there. just a thought maybe that could help you.

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