Is it a sensible exercise to just stand in the standing overhead press barbell stance for a while. Like a plank exercise.

Is it a sensible exercise to just stand in the standing overhead press barbell stance for a while. Like a plank exercise.
If no, why not?

  1. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I pause the last rep in extension for extra core gainz. Also to make sure everyone is thoroughly mogged by my lmao1pl8t press.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >mogged
      >1pl8 ohp

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        1pl OHP puts you above 99.9% of humans alive. Yeah there's stronger guys at the gym but you fags need to start looking at things in relation. Literally everyone except for manual laborers is weak nowadays so 1pl is pretty impressive by those standard. Press 2pl and you're literally elite amongst all humans to have ever lived.

  2. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    might work your traps and core a bit but you can hit those much more effectively other ways
    wouldn't do much for your delts since they work to get the weight up there, not so much to hold it there

  3. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    pointless

  4. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Yes. It's time under tension. Have fun.

  5. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    yes if you want to turn into a manlet by crushing your spine

  6. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    i unironically do that whilst lifting because i find it easier to breathe at the top of the lift then when its at the bottom

    am i retarded?

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      nah you're good

  7. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    having your arms above your head for any length of time is bad for your shoulder. This includes doing OHP in the first place.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      retard.

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        there is nothing in the medical literature that shows that any type of overhead work or movement is healthy for the shoulders, and all the literature we have of the matter shows substantial risks.

        https://uwaterloo.ca/centre-of-research-expertise-for-the-prevention-of-musculoskeletal-disorders/resources/position-papers/overhead-work-reduce-injury-risk

        https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4647145/

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Neither of these studies says what you say they do, the second one doesn't even refer to exercise science

          • 2 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            that's because you're dumb and don't understand the underlying biomechanics.

            Whether it is in work or in athletics, shoulder injuries are common among people that do any kind of work in an overhead position, both from a more chronic and long term view in regards to work and in short acute bursts in regards to athletics. What do you not get here

            • 2 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              You can't extrapolate the results of empirical research because you've convinced yourself through abstraction that the underlying mechanics are similar or analogous for another scenario. If you could there wouldn't be a need for very much empirical research at all.

              Show me a study that says overhead resistance TRAINING is unhealthy and I'll grant you the point.

              By the way, the second study you linked (the one relating to athletics) specifically recommends resistance training as a preventative measure for shoulder injury

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          >if you use your shoulder joint, then your shoulder has a chance to get injured
          Retard.
          That doesn't mean you can't train your shoulders safely, Your second sources fundamental point was using overhead exercises to prevent shoulder injuries you retard. Anyway, If what you said is true, then why does weightlifting, the sport of lifting the most amount of weight over your head have the lowest shoulder injury rate of any sports.

          >don't understand the underlying biomechanics.
          Retard.
          Just because you could get injured, and some people unfortunately do, that doesn't mean the position is fundamentally harmful. Some people have gotten injured walking, that doesn't mean walking is a harmful activity rather than a natural anatomical function of the human body. You are making the equivalent in regards to overhead positions.

          >shoulder injuries are common among people that do any kind of work in an overhead position
          No, they are most common in people with weak and unstable shoulder joints. training overhead is a good way to prevent this.

          • 2 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >lowest shoulder injury rate of any sports.
            By a magnitude of 4 compared to soccer lol.

            Also I should add, they're injuries generally. using another source, 18% of weightlifting injuries are shoulder injuries, so to do grade school math for you, 18% of the 0.0006 figure are are shoulder injuries making a shoulder injury rate per 100 participation hours 0.000108.

            https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1322916/?page=4

            doing the same for basketball
            >Epidemiology of sports injuries in basketball: integrative systematic review
            >Shoulder, arm and forearm injuries for professionals = 6.2% (7.9 for 'masters'), making a shoulder injury rate per 100 participation hours 0.6386. okay forearm and arm injuries are being considered shoulder injuries, boosting shoulder injury numbers. but the difference between weightlifting and basketball is still a magnitude of 4, I wouldn't worry about it.

            You can do the same for other sports, I'm not gonna bother, basketball was easy to do because its researched a lot being a popular sport.

            • 2 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              Its: Shoulder, Spine and Hip injuries and then arms and finer parts.

              • 2 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                Nah actually its shoulder, arm and forearm injuries, what I said. haha retard 😀

                There is no evidence supporting the use of overhead pressing movements in regards to the health of the shoulder.

                You will never see a physical therapist prescribe an overhead press to a patient in order to rehab their shoulder. This means that an overhead pressing movement is degenerative and not regenerative or constructive to the shoulder.

                >physical therapist prescribe an overhead press to a patient in order to rehab their shoulder.

                Anecdotally I have personally rehabs shoulder injuries just by overhead pressing with lighter weight and meticulous form.
                Anyway, rehabilitation is different then being prophylactic, so you've yet to make a point. That being said, physical therapists do prescribe overhead rotator cuff work, and dumbbell presses, other overhead work all the time. Fussing over muh overhead press is moving the goalpost anyway.

                the movement you have pictured here has one of the highest injury rates in sports, at about 56%

                https://paulogentil.com/pdf/The%20Epidemiology%20of%20Injuries%20Across%20the%20Weight-Training%20Sports.pdf

                Nope, you didn't even read your source. It only looks at weightlifting, powerlifting, bodybuilding, strongman, Highland Games, and CrossFit, not all 'sports' running and jumping would be otherwise, and the 56% you pulled out of your ass, In CrossFit both gymnastics and powerlifting events have more of the injuries than the weightlifting event, which as the most amount of injuries for the movement (compared to the sport of weightlifting, the only other sport that has that tests the movement.

                I'm right, you're wrong simple as 😀 hehe

                I know its embarrassing being wrong :O

              • 2 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                >That being said, physical therapists do prescribe overhead rotator cuff work, and dumbbell presses, other overhead work all the time.

                No they do not. There is no evidence supporting overhead work in regards to rehabbing the shoulders. The therapists at my orthopedic clinic do not prescribe such exercises.

                Rehab is not different in this instance. The point is building versus destroying the shoulder. In rehab, you seek to build the muscles around the joint to take the load off the joint itself. An overhead press stresses the joint. A load that stresses the joint is not constructive or regenerative to that joint.

                There are safer alternatives that work the shoulder.

              • 2 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                zzzzzzzz more made up bullshit.

                its past my 10:30 bedtime where I am, I'm going to bed. Not sure about the clinic you're familiar with, but at the clinic my grandmother went to, they did prescribe her dumbbell presses actually. One google search shows other physical therapists prescribe overhead presses, they say so on their personal shitty websites.

                Humans evolved from muh monkeys that hung from trees, hands overhead. Been a while but since, humans preceding evolution, we've been doing stuff overhead, throwing stuff and picking fruits from trees. having your arms over your head is anatomical function of your shoulder joint, otherwise you wouldn't be able to do so, so easily.

              • 2 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                hanging from a tree utilizes muscles far differently and the load is not placed on the shoulder joint.

                You don't even understand the underlying mechanics of a shoulder press

            • 2 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              the movement you have pictured here has one of the highest injury rates in sports, at about 56%

              https://paulogentil.com/pdf/The%20Epidemiology%20of%20Injuries%20Across%20the%20Weight-Training%20Sports.pdf

          • 2 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            There is no evidence supporting the use of overhead pressing movements in regards to the health of the shoulder.

            You will never see a physical therapist prescribe an overhead press to a patient in order to rehab their shoulder. This means that an overhead pressing movement is degenerative and not regenerative or constructive to the shoulder.

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          >the literature

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          been doing heavy OHP for years and my shoulders feel good

  8. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Look up isometric exercises.

  9. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    In the army they would have us stand with our rifles over our heads for a long time, even with just seven pounds it was an absolute beast.

  10. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I did this last week just for fun, I feel like atlas

  11. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    If you are too lazy to work multiple exercises to save time, try and do at least 5 count holds with OHP. There's also the lunge squat OHP if you want to do leg day, every days well as upper body.

  12. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I did one armed handstands when I was a teen. Relaxed a little then the shoulder dislocated and I fell on my head. The shoulder hurt the most and is still fucked now that I'm old...

  13. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    No, but picrel is

  14. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    You gays with your 'studies' don't know shit. Some nonsense experiments conducted on a group of random losers by some nerdy scientists who have never picked up a weight in their life don't know shit.

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