Is it safe to work out with a "tingly" feeling from Tendonitis?

About 2 years ago and got pretty bad tendonitis in both elbow tendons from overexerting myself, extreme pain, numbness, the whole shebang. Sadly, it never 100% healed and probably will never. I do not have pain anymore, but I still have this tingly sensation that goes from my elbows to my fingers, sometimes it's barely there, sometimes, like now, very noticeable. My question is, is that a thing that will just always be there no matter what I do and can I safely train or is this a sign of me having to stop all exercise completely, forever. I am not talking about lifting gargantuan weights, just calisthetnics (push-up, pull-up) + OHP.

  1. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    I healed my knee tendonitis with ostarine. Wasn’t expecting it, that was a few years ago.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Look up bpc-157

      Both of those are experimental drugs, which I can only buy outside my country and both say "Not for human consumption" on the packaging. Sorry, but that does not seem like an option for me.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Simply stretch each of the lower 3 fingers backwards, to stretch and release the tension in the carpal tunnels. The pain comes from improper grip, as you are supposed to grip with your hands tight around the bar. Your shit form and negligence has caused you this trouble, now fix it. Look up the AthleanX video for reference.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          Key Point #1: Rest is NOT recommended

          As discussed above, tendons adapt in response to mechanical stimuli based on dosage of activity. If loading is under-dosed or absent altogether, tendons adapt by decreasing their capacity for activity. For this reason, we strongly advise against rest for tendinopathy. Even though rest can help individuals avoid experiencing symptoms, a return to activity usually results in a resurgence of symptoms since the capacity for load has been reduced. Ultimately, this results in an even lower threshold before experiencing symptoms upon return to activity. Tendons must therefore be stimulated as part of the recovery process to desired activities.

          Key Point #2: Pain symptoms will be part of the rehab process

          It is important to set expectations early that symptoms will be part of the rehabilitation process. We do not need an individual to be “pain free” before engaging in activity, since pain does not reflect ongoing tissue damage or harm. [9-13] This is another reason complete rest is not recommended. [8]

          To be clear, however, we do not recommend completely ignoring your experience and pushing forward anyways without making modifications. Even though symptoms will be present in rehab, they should not exceed your individual tolerance level (see figure 1 below). One way of thinking about tolerance is the idea of not feeling debilitated during or after activity, where pain is consistently occupying your mind, or you feel limited in your ability to complete routine daily activities.

          https://www.barbellmedicine.com/blog/the-barbell-medicine-guide-to-tendinopathy/
          https://www.barbellmedicine.com/blog/pain-in-training-what-do/
          https://www.barbellmedicine.com/blog/pain-and-movement-caught-in-an-endless-loop-of-misinformation/

          This is wrong he means good be he has sadly fallen down the AthleanX rabbit hole. Very bad. Maybe he'll see the error of those ways one day.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            recent physiotherapy research suggests that you back off and do light things to help with problems instead of resting it.

            You should only rest it if it's a problem that just happened and you take a day or two off, then you can go back to exercising, just back off until you can move it without pain.

            Apply this same concept to your tingling, what is likely happening is that you still have the tendon inflammation and that is compressing the nerves. To fix this you need to be working the tendon, but not maximally, to increase what little bloodflow there is to the tendon and to get your body to heal the tissue.

            Thanks for replying. I guess I will resume doing my calisthenics work, while not going too overboard. Push-ups, chin-ups, OHP, 3 sets, that's it.

  2. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Look up bpc-157

  3. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >visit a doctor
    or
    >ask IST
    hmmm...

  4. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >tingly
    Are you sure it's tendonitis and not Cubital tunnel syndrome?

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      >Cubital tunnel syndrome
      Just googled, man that shit is scaring me a ton.
      I'll try to find a doc to be sure.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Came here to post this. OP, what fingers does the tingling shoot down to and do you have any numbness in the front of back of any fingers.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        No numbness, affected fingers are small, ring and (maybe a littke bit) my middle fingger, like those 2 years back when I snapped my shit up. Tingling is on said fingers, on my lower arm and elbow.
        I really, really hope

        recent physiotherapy research suggests that you back off and do light things to help with problems instead of resting it.

        You should only rest it if it's a problem that just happened and you take a day or two off, then you can go back to exercising, just back off until you can move it without pain.

        Apply this same concept to your tingling, what is likely happening is that you still have the tendon inflammation and that is compressing the nerves. To fix this you need to be working the tendon, but not maximally, to increase what little bloodflow there is to the tendon and to get your body to heal the tissue.

        is right and it's just my tendonitis flaring up and pressing on my nerve and not that cubital tunnel syndrome, that sounds fucking scary.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          There is a high chance that's early cubital tunnel syndrome. See a specialist now and most likely you'll be able to treat it with conservative therapies like stretches, exercises, and activity modification. Wait too long and it will be surgery time. I have also heard good things about taurine supplementation for entrapment syndromes so consider giving that a try on top of what the specalist recommends.
          t. An actual M.D. on this board.

  5. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    recent physiotherapy research suggests that you back off and do light things to help with problems instead of resting it.

    You should only rest it if it's a problem that just happened and you take a day or two off, then you can go back to exercising, just back off until you can move it without pain.

    Apply this same concept to your tingling, what is likely happening is that you still have the tendon inflammation and that is compressing the nerves. To fix this you need to be working the tendon, but not maximally, to increase what little bloodflow there is to the tendon and to get your body to heal the tissue.

  6. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >have tendonitis
    >don't train
    >it gets worse
    >train
    >it gets worse

  7. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Why is everyone so helpful in this thread but nobody helps me with my shoulder injury?

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Yeah let's read your mind before you even post about it

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        One of my shoulders started to hurt when I was doing lateral raises like a week ago. Yesterday I tried to do them again with the same weight and I had a sharp pain on my shoulder so I lowered the weight and finished my sets. Now my shoulder hurts when I lift my arm up. I'm wondering if I got tendonitis or I really torn my shit up?

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      take an ice bath and go CRY ABOUT IT

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Don't tell me what to do bro

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      fuck you and your shoulder

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Hey fuck you!

  8. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    i had that once and i found some yoga dude or whatever on youtube telling you to pressure the forearm with your knee or some shit like that, various exercises. helped me a lot, never had it again.

  9. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Look into antagonist training.
    I gave myself tendonitis from climbing but by focusing on antagonist training, I worked out the muscular imbalances which were putting more stress on the tendons/ elbow.
    Reverse wrist curls are one of the exercises I find helps.

  10. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    You should get elbow braces. It stops my elbows from tingling when I wear them

  11. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Ask a real fucking doctor bro

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      hes american therefore cant do that

  12. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    do an gymnastics warm up routine beforehand

  13. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    get a light band and do 100 reps of tricep extensions and curls every day

  14. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >tendonitis
    It never goes away.
    t. I know

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