Is there a way to get into heavy lifting (squats, deadlifts) after a Herniated Disc?

Got the diagnose of Herniated Disc in the lumbar spine space last week, now trying to figure out if there is a way to get back into heavy lifting. Any suggestions?

  1. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    heay squats and deadlifts are overrated
    being healthy and pain free is way better
    i switched from squats to only bodyweight exercises for legs
    pistol squats, jump squats, horse stance, bulgarian split squats, nrodic hamstring curls
    really just a hard conditiong with high reps or long holds, explosive movements
    legs still look the same, but i do run faster, feel better and my back and knees stopped hurting

  2. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    bist du deutsch?

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      nein

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      yes I am

  3. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Find a good physio.

    T. Guy who herniated two discs and is now pulling 5 plates for reps.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      In time it might "heal"/become symptomless. Risk of reinjury is way higher though. If you really love lifting heavy weights(squat/diddly) specific find solid PT. It might be easier (and smarter in long run) just to do lighter shit, bulgarian split squats, GHR etc.

      >hur dur find a good PT

      just tell us what exercises he makes you do
      don't be secret like this

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        google exercises for lumbar disc herniation

  4. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >egolifter snaps his shit up and cripples himself for life

    Rippetoe claims yet another victim.

  5. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    My father has psysichal labor.
    2 herniated disc.
    he simply ignores the pain

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Once they impinge the nerves you can’t ignore the pain anymore because your shit turns off and you fall on the floor

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        He literaly does though.
        still working at age 57 and will work till 60

  6. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    In time it might "heal"/become symptomless. Risk of reinjury is way higher though. If you really love lifting heavy weights(squat/diddly) specific find solid PT. It might be easier (and smarter in long run) just to do lighter shit, bulgarian split squats, GHR etc.

  7. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Caleb, you told me you were going to help your buddy on his farm today. Wtf are you doing here?

  8. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Where's that guy with the back pain pasta when you need him?

  9. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    I don't care to answer this question in full, however after your injury has healed and you have rehabilitated yourself, it's likely that you will be able to work your way up to heavy squats and deadlifts. You're welcome to dive into Stuart McGill's YouTube channel as he is a physiotherapist that specializes in spine health, for which strength and power athletes are among his top clients

  10. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    get a good coach
    use drugs
    wear supportive gear

  11. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Rather than give you the copy/paste replies I have seen to this question over the 15 years I have been on this website, I'd like to contribute something original to you.

    Ask yourself anon, do you really work out to have the strongest squat, or would you be content to just have a squat that would be heavier than 95% of the guys at the bar? Do you exclusively want to be strong, or do you want to look good as well?

    An aesthetic approach to fitness will make you stronger than most guys out there, but you will look good. These power lifting routines will get you strong and fat.

    Starting Strength is the worst thing that has happened to the fitness industry in decades.

  12. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Yes, it can resorb. However, there's little association between herniated/bulging discs and back pain. On top of that, you can do movements that don't aggravate your back if it is in pain, and then gradually build back up to the major compounds if needed.

  13. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Use the machines that support your back. Rest your disc first for a few months, do extreme reps, low weight. Like 1000 reps for 5 sets. Eat well. Rest well. Drink some sedative at night if needed. Do back stretches type exercises lying flat that are for sciatica. Inversion table therapy. The part of body building most overlooked is the healing.

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