Lifting 7 Days a Week

Gonna try a new way of programming.

I'm just gonna do one to two exercises for general muscle groups (i.e. Arms, chest, back, legs)

I'll load up a heavy weight and do 1 to 3 sets of 1 to 3 reps, this will be my strength exercise. For hypertrophy, I'll do 1 to 3 sets of 6 to 10 reps.

The first exercise can be any exercise that I feel works the respective muscle group the best, so for legs I could do heavy squats. For the second exercise, I would do something for the same muscle group but maybe isolate a part that wasn't hit as hard as I wanted it to. Or, I could just repeat the same exercise with a slight variation in stance and just go for the more hypertrophic stimulus.

I would rotate exercises frequently as to keep a good, novel stimulus going but keeping the stimulus strong. So like one session for legs I could do back squats, next is front squats, next is sprints or hill sprints, next is deadlifts, and so on and so forth.

I'll be able to manage fatigue by auto-regulating each day while still keeping myself in a anabolic state. I'll prevent central fatigue by keeping the number of sets and reps low and more intensive as the main culprit for central fatigue is usually the level of stress be accrued (usually aerobically).

Contrary to popular belief, forcing yourself to recover and rest after exercising isn't all that beneficial. Training is more important and this auto-regulation each day is more beneficial. As said above, the reason why you may hit a level of fatigue isn't from the amount rest you're not getting but rather the amount of stress you're accruing in a session.

>tl;dr

High frequency, low sets/reps, high intensity, pseudo upper/lower split seems like a great idea to become a well-rounded athlete

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  1. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Didn't read, but I do full body every day.

  2. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >7x a week
    >well rounded athlete
    lol

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      It's maybe a couple times less than most athletes would train. What is even your point?

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        you have absolutely no clue whatsoever how athletes train lol

        t. know several olympic track and field athletes, nba+nhl stars, golf, tennis pros

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          >t. powershitter who's now deluded himself into thinking he's an athlete.

  3. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    I hope this thread doesn't get buried in shit on the catalogue because it's actually kind of good.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      That's exactly why it won't make it past 15 posts.

  4. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    kiss goodbye to your test and gh levels.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      >If you do busy work for the sake of busy work and run yourself into a wall instead of actually adapting the a stimulus, you'll have increased physical stress levels that negatively effect testosterone

      Solution: Variation and auto-regulation! Just keep doing different exercises and variation of exercises that keep calling forth adaptation. Take each day as they come and adjust workload.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Isn't detraining what happens when you don't work out frequently?

      you have absolutely no clue whatsoever how athletes train lol

      t. know several olympic track and field athletes, nba+nhl stars, golf, tennis pros

      >you have absolutely no clue whatsoever how athletes train lol
      Here's a live example of a professional D1 athlete who works out 6 to 7 days a week.

      ?si=xhjQ66Sx6E9g1XDr
      >know several olympic track and field athletes, nba+nhl stars, golf, tennis pros
      What pro athletes do you know?

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      >Isn't detraining what happens when you don't work out frequently?
      their test and gh went up when they took a break from training. The constant daily hard training stresses the body and causes inflammation which is bad for hormones over time.

  5. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >Contrary to popular belief, forcing yourself to recover and rest after exercising isn't all that beneficial
    >Source: my ass
    Dont spew bullshit like its fact. I get that you're excited about your newbie gains but after a few years of actually intense training, you'll see why rest is crucial

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      >Dont spew bullshit like its fact
      It is, pre-programming rest days isn't beneficial.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Your approach is called top and back off btw.
      I would increase reps on ht exercises .
      Central fatigue can be achieved with one PR rep deadlift. It’s intensity and or volume that creates nervous system fatigue. Just be mindful of overtraining.
      All in all I like your new program. The low volume per muscle group may not work for everyone but if you react well to intensity it might do it for you.
      Rotating exercises is not a must imo, new stimulus seems to be mostly psychological but to each his own, it’s not an issue if the goal is not strength competition

      >training more than 3x week as a natty

      If you don't need at least 2-3 recovery days then you're either a DYEL getting noob gains or you're not pushing yourself hard enough (not doing negatives/not training to failure).

      I'm gonna shill this guy pretty hard but for good reason as all of what he says is pretty bulletproof and sensible:

      Why working the minimums effect dose works well:

      ?si=0JqC8mxkO-mTY54F
      Why focusing and adjusting on training is more important than recovery:

      ?si=uvMJGj5cleG0enYF
      Definitions of the two major fatigues:

      ?si=uP8Pti-G_Two3lZb

      ?si=uDPbDxYyYgFt0-kA

      So that's my source, some bald manlet.

  6. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    I'm thinking about trying something similar for a while. Easy and often.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      It worked well for me but it was often but short and intense. I respond well to intensity and it’s a program that fits well into a busy life and a gym nearby

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        True. Some of my best gains came when I was really busy and only had 20 min a day to train. Trained every day.
        Day 1: heavy deadlift singles x 5 (approx 80-85% 1rm) & pullups 10min emom
        Day 2: walk up and down stairs in apartment building for 20 mins

        It kinda just worked. I'm tempted to run the same program in the new year because it was so simple and effective. But I also want to try a kettlebell routine as well, just to see how well my body reacts to them.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          Also, for a while, I ran Day 1 everyday for about a month with no issues of overtraining.

  7. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Your approach is called top and back off btw.
    I would increase reps on ht exercises .
    Central fatigue can be achieved with one PR rep deadlift. It’s intensity and or volume that creates nervous system fatigue. Just be mindful of overtraining.
    All in all I like your new program. The low volume per muscle group may not work for everyone but if you react well to intensity it might do it for you.
    Rotating exercises is not a must imo, new stimulus seems to be mostly psychological but to each his own, it’s not an issue if the goal is not strength competition

  8. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >training more than 3x week as a natty

    If you don't need at least 2-3 recovery days then you're either a DYEL getting noob gains or you're not pushing yourself hard enough (not doing negatives/not training to failure).

  9. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    The problem with your idea is it's way less fatiguing to not lift weights for a day than it is to do a small number of difficult sets every day. You're better off doing slightly more sets per workout and training like 4 days a week than you are to do slightly less & train every day.

  10. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Sounds like something Dan John would do

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      I've recently been learning about the Dan John/ Pavel Tsatsouline 'easy and often' philosophy and it is fantastic. Good gains with low fatigue and I like programming my sessions on building energy instead of draining energy.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Yeah 'Easy Strength' is a good read for this kind of stuff

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          Great book. A blog a found recently is a good collection of 'easy and often' thought called: leansoliddogs
          Worth a look if this type of training interests you

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            Will check it out.

            Speaking of blogs and high frequency training, John Phung posted this to his blog a long while back and I think it's relevant to this thread.

            https://www.johnphung.com/blog/6743/one-exercise-per-day/

            • 2 months ago
              Anonymous

              Man, thats kinda like how the bugez trained in his basement. Choose an exercise, max out every day, and when you stall, change the exercise and start again.

  11. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    This only works for me during heavy periods of triathlete training where I'm constantly running/biking/swimming for hours every single day. I only do like 1 to 3 sets of 1 to 3 reps like you mention and get really strong. A lot of times it's only 1 set of 1 rep every day but it works really well.

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