>Muscles need to be worked at about 90% effort or until very close to failure to grow

>Muscles need to be worked at about 90% effort or until very close to failure to grow
>Failure is considered when you can no longer do reps with decent form
>If you go back in the gym and cannot PR or get very close, you likely need more recovery

Is this true?

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  1. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    ssunbiki

  2. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Yes.
    This is the only good thread on IST.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      So is the reason some people get bigger specific muscles is likely their body recoveries better for that muscle?

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Do you mean to say that someone is working and resting all their muscles equally, but some of those muscles are disproportionately larger than the others? I don't know. That doesn't happen to me, and I don't know what the cause would be.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        They work the muscle more and it probably recovers better over time, yes. But consistency, volume, and actually putting the effort in all matter just as much.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        There's more too it than that.
        1. Proper nutrition (Getting enough complete bio-available protein)
        2. Proper rest
        3. Proper form using the required muscle building technique. Maximum time under tension in the elongated position, where the exercise has the greatest tension IN the elongated position.
        4. Experimenting with your SRA curve based on each muscle.

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          wtf is that graph supposed to be showing me

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Stimulus recovery adaptation curve

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Each workout point is the stimulus to trigger muscle growth. The red drop is the recovery phase, and the blue uptick is the adaption of muscles (the muscle build phase). Every muscle has a different SRA curve and it's different for every person and would change over time from both the increase in strength, and the increase in load. Someone doing Mike Mentzer HIT training with really heavy weights would need longer recovery time. Some newbie lifting 15lbs would need less. Also, there's a difference in Type 1 and Type 2 muscles (fast and slow twitch fibers). Meaning, your forearms and calves are different than your hamstrings and biceps.

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          what constitutes too frequently and what constitutes too infrequently?

  3. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Go search 'hypertrophy' on google scholar, any papers you can't see on there use sci-hub to read. Peer reviewed research will give you better info than the morons on a laotian silk dyeing forum.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >peer reviewed exercise science
      lmao

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >preferring to take advice from a korean rice-harvesting forum
        sure exercise science is sketchy at best, but it's at least as good as any other advice you're gonna get

  4. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >>If you go back in the gym and cannot PR or get very close, you likely need more recovery
    Only applies to beginners. If you're able to progress or come close to a PR session-to-session you're simply not moving much weight at all.

  5. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    is considered when you can no longer do reps with decent form
    Not always. If it's an exercise where injury from poor form is a risk, then yes. Otherwise go crazy on the final set
    >>If you go back in the gym and cannot PR or get very close, you likely need more recovery
    No, you sometimes just have genuinely good/bad days, or don't eat enough or whatever, and consistently working through the bad days is critical. If you're regularly plateauing and you have under 48 hours of recovery, maybe that's the issue

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >Otherwise go crazy on the final set
      Is something like an AMRAP as the final set good use for this then?

      >No, you sometimes just have genuinely good/bad days, or don't eat enough or whatever, and consistently working through the bad days is critical.
      So about within 10% of your last lift, or adding some progression of reps etc would be fine?

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Not him, but what I like to do when I fail to reach my rep goal is to put a little asterisk next to that exercise in my notepad. When I get four asterisks next to an exercise, then it's time to reevaluate my training.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >Is something like an AMRAP as the final set good use for this then?
        Didn't know that acronym but yeah. Try to keep good form as long as possible though,
        >So about within 10% of your last lift, or adding some progression of reps etc would be fine?
        More like if you're doing badly for at least a week. An individual workout is subject to too many different variables to give you much information.
        If you can usually do 20 pushups in a row, but can only do 15 one day, it might be lack of recovery, or bad nutrition, or stress, or not enough sleep that night, or you're distracted, or any number of things. You need at least 2 or 3 sessions to be sure

  6. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    is that a troony? why does her lower abdomen look so strange?

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      That is a real woman. Her name is ssunbiki. you prolly don't know this but she is a plus sized model in Korea. Yes thats a fat woman by Korean standards

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >Korea.
        Well that explains the extremely unnatural troonlike esthetic.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        thats a fat woman everywhere in the world dude

  7. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Too fat.

  8. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    What the frick is effort? How's it measured?
    This is bad and you should feel bad.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      He literally explains it in the next sentence you moron. He's talking about going to failure and using the word effort

  9. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Just want everyone to know she's considered a "plus size" model in Korea.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      her proportions are unnatural and created by surgery

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      anyone can tell dude. she's fat as frick.

  10. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >worked at about 90% effort
    Your muscles do not have effort. They just contract in accordance with nervous impulses. Your brain on the other is the organ where effort is relevant. Effort is also relative to the lifter.
    >until very close to failure to grow
    Unless you're an advanced lifter, you should train to failure. You're not able to predict RIR accurately unless you've actually be training to failure for a couple years.

    As a beginner however, you don't need to train to failure. Just start lifting light enough that you can perform an arbitrary number of reps (say 5 or 10) without a lot of effort, focus on technique, and add 5-10 lbs every week until you get to the point where you can no longer complete reps.

    >Failure is considered when you can no longer do reps with decent form
    No. That is not failure. Failure is muscular failure. That when you cannot complete the concentric portion of a movement. You get stuck in the middle of the concentric and can't move the weight further.

    Treating deterioration of form as a factor to determine failure is not correct. You can have unstable form on a squat where your form deteriorates after rep 5. Your quads/glutes may have been able to perform two, three or maybe even five more reps if your form and technique was stable. Form breakdown does not indicate failure. Form breakdown just means you need to work on form more during a motion to stabilize it or to change to an exercise in which you can perform with stable form. It's not going to be a problem on machine curls or machine presses.
    >>If you go back in the gym and cannot PR or get very close, you likely need more recovery
    No. It doesn't mean that. It just means increases in PRs has just slowed down. It's normal for an advanced lifter to take as long as a year to add 5-10 lbs to a lift. And intermediate or advanced lifter will have to wait a lot longer until they've accumulated enough strength to lift more.

  11. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    need to be worked at about 90% effort or until very close to failure to grow
    I don't believe that since Greasing The Groove works.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Muscle size and strength aren't 1-1. From my understanding GTG simply improves the # of muscle fibers that are recruited for a movement, thereby improving strength

  12. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    you can grow your muscles with 30% of 1RM
    doing something > doing nothing

  13. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I'd slip my tongue as deep into her bumhole as it will go

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