Realistic, achievable standards to be considered strong to normies who aren't mentally ill

These are the standards to be considered strong by regular people in a commercial gym not including people with OCD, BDD, roidtrannies, terminally online, fitfluencers and powershitters. If you are in the gym exceeding these standards or working sets that indicate an ability to exceed these standards, average people will think of you as 'strong' and you will likely get at least occasional person asking you for advice, spots or compliments in the gym.

1x bw ohp, 1.5x bw bench, 2x bw squat, 2.5x bw deadlift

no quarter reps, no belts, no gloves, no diapers, no sumo stance, no bouncing the weight, no touch and go, no standing chest presses, no cat back rack pulls. just lift the weight with the correct form full ROM and a slight pause.

That's it. That's all it takes to never be seen as a DYEL again.

>> bodyweight ratio cope

bodyweight ratio is mostly adjusting for the height of the lifter and body type. The ideal bodyweight can vary based on genetics but also which sports you prefer and it's not strictly better to be built as a rugby player or a footballer.
Height of course it's strictly better to be taller, but that is an independent perception from strength. Subconciously people adjust their standards to the size of the person in terms of whether or not they think the person is strong. Lifting ridiculous raw numbers at a short height and carrying a superphysiological amount of muscle on a stubby frame (Jay Cutler mode) will not compensate for height.

Severely overweight lifters might be seen as big and strong if they are able to put up big raw numbers, but they are not generally looked up to or seen as strong in the same way as a lifter who maintains a healthy body composition and greatly exceeds them in pound for pound strength. For these reasons bodyweight ratio is the most appropriate and realistic

  1. 5 months ago
    Anonymous

    it's more like 0.75 1.25 1.75 2.25

  2. 5 months ago
    Anonymous

    dumb retard doesnt realize this is literally just 1/2/3/4 or worse

    • 5 months ago
      Anonymous

      60 kg males are females

      • 5 months ago
        Anonymous

        Its generally a higher standard than 1/2/3/4 .

        Standards slightly lowered in the deadlift for lightweights (normies generally don't know or care about this lift, and will be impressed by >3pl8 because it looks like a lot of weight on the bar and they don't know how the standards compare to other lifts) but the standards in general are higher for an average guy (170-180lb) and much higher for the lifts normies are more impressed by (ohp and bench).

        this is meant to be a higher standard in general because 1/2/3/4 is the cutoff for nondyel(probably too high of a standard) and this is the standard for being seen as strong

        Not him, but 1/2/3/4 is for 5 reps which should be pretty close to those posted

        • 5 months ago
          Anonymous

          would depend on your weight.

    • 5 months ago
      Anonymous

      Its generally a higher standard than 1/2/3/4 .

      Standards slightly lowered in the deadlift for lightweights (normies generally don't know or care about this lift, and will be impressed by >3pl8 because it looks like a lot of weight on the bar and they don't know how the standards compare to other lifts) but the standards in general are higher for an average guy (170-180lb) and much higher for the lifts normies are more impressed by (ohp and bench).

      this is meant to be a higher standard in general because 1/2/3/4 is the cutoff for nondyel(probably too high of a standard) and this is the standard for being seen as strong

  3. 5 months ago
    Anonymous

    I'm currently at 0.9x OHP, 1.2x BP, 1.6x Squat (stopped squatting though), and 2.2x DL. So close bros...

  4. 5 months ago
    Anonymous

    So my fat ass should be able to squat 520lb?

  5. 5 months ago
    Anonymous

    If you aren't obese you'll get people miring and asking for advice well before you hit these. Especially on bench, I've gotten a lot of attention for repping 205 lbs at around 170 bw. I was probably around a 2pl8 1rm but 1.5xBW would have been ~255 lbs.

  6. 5 months ago
    Anonymous

    This is even good for the average powershitter.

    To achieve absolute domination I would add something like dips +50% bw, pull up +40% bw, maybe something like farmer walk, throwing sandbags, running 10km unter 50 min, 10 muscle ups and so on to become ultimate Allrounder and mog everyone in every discipline.

    • 5 months ago
      Anonymous

      >unter
      Hans...

  7. 5 months ago
    Anonymous

    Yeah I mean honestly I pretty much agree with you, maybe slightly lower OHP.

    • 5 months ago
      Anonymous

      I agree the ohp standard is too high, since basically 1 pl8 reps at any reasonable weight is pretty impressive. I was just going for round numbers

  8. 5 months ago
    Anonymous

    >90kg ohp
    >135kg bench
    >180kg squat
    >225kg deadlift
    That's not strong. That's insane.

    • 5 months ago
      Anonymous

      it seems insane because 99% of men who weigh 90kg are fat and shooting themselve in the foot . Picrel is what 90kg 180cm looks like on someone who's lean (not single digits in that pic) and surely can lift much more than those numbers.

      • 5 months ago
        Anonymous

        this guy probably can't OHP 90kg strict, or just about barely if he's not a powershitter. There's guys that size at my gym who press around 1pl8 for reps (amounts to 70-80 kg 1RM); they don't lift for strength though

        • 5 months ago
          Anonymous

          Yeah I agreed already the ohp metric is too high and anyone who does 1pl8 for reps will be seen as strong. Maybe it should be 0.75

          also, bodyweight ratio is a huge cope for manlets, especially since the lifts get even harder for tall guys due to longer limbs, so the bodyweight ratio is a double punishment for the lanklets. Just make it absolute, and 1/2/3/4 is well-agreed to be an early-intermediate standard where you can call yourself a lifter, and 1.5/2.75/4/5 is where you're stronger than most normies.

          nothing will be perfect in every context. Average male is like 175cm with 75kg lean will be muscular and strong.

          90% of men falls between 165 cm and 185cm with a healthy lean weight in around 65-85kg range(or even lower if you aren't musculed). only reason to be over the healthy range is because of additional muscle. fatties and estaters can keep coping. this scale works fine for 90% of men with the caveat of OHP lowered to match the others.

          midgets are irrelevant with any scale so who cares and 200cm lanklets can cry about it to their chiropractor

  9. 5 months ago
    Anonymous

    >Realistic, achievable standards

    This is the siren song of a COPELORD. Whenever you hear "realistic" or "achievable" it's an attempt to push mediocrity

  10. 5 months ago
    Anonymous

    Sumo stance is just a leg press combined with a rack pull.

  11. 5 months ago
    Anonymous

    also, bodyweight ratio is a huge cope for manlets, especially since the lifts get even harder for tall guys due to longer limbs, so the bodyweight ratio is a double punishment for the lanklets. Just make it absolute, and 1/2/3/4 is well-agreed to be an early-intermediate standard where you can call yourself a lifter, and 1.5/2.75/4/5 is where you're stronger than most normies.

  12. 5 months ago
    Anonymous

    too many factors bro (how normie, how big of a gym, etc.), in 2 years I've never seen someone bench more than a plate at my gym (very small city), they'd probably consider a 80kg bench something massive. I like the scaling to bodyweight tho, makes way more sense than just counting plates.

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