>The back squat resulted in significantly higher compressive forces and knee extensor moments than the front squat.

>The back squat resulted in significantly higher compressive forces and knee extensor moments than the front squat. Shear forces at the knee were small in magnitude, posteriorly directed, and did not vary between the squat variations. Although bar position did not influence muscle activity, muscle activation during the ascending phase was significantly greater than during the descending phase. The front squat was as effective as the back squat in terms of overall muscle recruitment, with significantly less compressive forces and extensor moments. The results suggest that front squats may be advantageous compared with back squats for individuals with knee problems such as meniscus tears, and for long-term joint health.
https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/19002072/

Just read a pubmed abstract, I now have the authority to tell you the lift you've been doing for years is bad. HAZA~!

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  1. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >compare front squat and back squat
    >only evaluate knees
    >don't evaluate shoulders, wrists or elbows
    moronic study.

    • 1 week ago
      Anonymous

      but what about ankles and discs?

  2. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I'm zercher squatting so I don't care about any of you.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Yummy cheese

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Zercher is a front squat the same way low bar is a back squat. It's just a front squat with a more advantageous center of gravity

  3. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >The results suggest that front squats may be advantageous compared with back squats for individuals with knee problems such as meniscus tears, and for long-term joint health.

    Assumption 1: higher compressive forces and knee extensor moments on a back squat will be enough of an issue to justify this change, (unfounded)

    Assumption 2: The front squat is as effective as the back squat due to similar overall muscle recruitment, (also unfounded)

    That second assumption is particularly egregious. Front squats will hit your quads, glutes & adductors less hard than back squats. Reason being that your limiting factor on a front squat is your core & upper back. Your upper backs ability to stay upright gets to RPE10 meanwhile your glutes & quads are at RPE5.
    To make matters even worse for a front squat, it's not even a particularly good exercise for growing the upper back since there's no active range of motion and no stretch. They hit the abs harder but this can be replicated with ab work which you should already be doing.
    In summary, front squats are a less effective lower body exercise than back squats, and while they hit the upper back much harder than back squats, they are not a particularly good upper back exercise either.
    Leave front squats to the Oly lifters.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      shut up

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Mad

        https://i.imgur.com/8K9Lalh.png

        >Front squats will hit your quads...less hard than back squats
        Google disagrees?

        Are you asking?

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          >Are you asking?
          Yea, I guess

          Front squats may have a greater degree of quad engagement compared to posterior chain engagement but if the back squat allows you to lift heavier weights then it may hit quads harder anyway.

          would be the answer assuming

          >The results suggest that front squats may be advantageous compared with back squats for individuals with knee problems such as meniscus tears, and for long-term joint health.

          Assumption 1: higher compressive forces and knee extensor moments on a back squat will be enough of an issue to justify this change, (unfounded)

          Assumption 2: The front squat is as effective as the back squat due to similar overall muscle recruitment, (also unfounded)

          That second assumption is particularly egregious. Front squats will hit your quads, glutes & adductors less hard than back squats. Reason being that your limiting factor on a front squat is your core & upper back. Your upper backs ability to stay upright gets to RPE10 meanwhile your glutes & quads are at RPE5.
          To make matters even worse for a front squat, it's not even a particularly good exercise for growing the upper back since there's no active range of motion and no stretch. They hit the abs harder but this can be replicated with ab work which you should already be doing.
          In summary, front squats are a less effective lower body exercise than back squats, and while they hit the upper back much harder than back squats, they are not a particularly good upper back exercise either.
          Leave front squats to the Oly lifters.

          was correct overall about quads.

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          >mad
          at what

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >Front squats will hit your quads...less hard than back squats
      Google disagrees?

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Front squats may have a greater degree of quad engagement compared to posterior chain engagement but if the back squat allows you to lift heavier weights then it may hit quads harder anyway.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      OP almost had me convinced, but i forgot about the limiting factors of core. good post, mate

    • 1 week ago
      Anonymous

      > Reason being that your limiting factor on a front squat is your core & upper back

      So? The limiting factor in back squats is lower back fatigue

    • 1 week ago
      Anonymous

      I definitely feel like my knees are better off when I front squat, and I think that's because the knees go over the toes much more when I'm front squatting.

      I mean, if you're talking about pure strength, sure, the back squat will always be better. Me, I have long femurs, and I back squat high bar style, and I also front squat. Front squats definitely hit your quads way harder because your torso simply has no choice but to stay upright if you don't want to dump the barbell. For glutes and hammies, sure, the front squat won't hit those as hard.
      I agree with some of what you've said but I wouldn't say front squats are "less effective". Less effective for what?
      For strength gains in the posterior chain? Sure, very poor compared to back squats especially low bar style.
      For quadriceps hypertrophy? I'd argue they're vastly superior to back squats in this regard.
      Though, your physiognomy and lever length heavily, heavily affect what muscles are active during what lifts and when. For me, I've found that front squats are simply an excellent rotation to hammer quads with a slightly higher rep range (6-10 reps) and I have no problem maintaining the wrist flexibility needed for a front rack position. I wouldn't make sweeping statements like "front squats are less effective." The reality is that it's much more nuanced than that.

      • 1 week ago
        Anonymous

        >"less effective"
        Less effective for total strength/mass gains.
        >vastly superior to back squats
        Put shit under heels wala back squats are superior. I had massive quad pump from 20 rep lowbar squats.

    • 1 week ago
      Anonymous

      >That second assumption is particularly egregious. Front squats will hit your quads, glutes & adductors less hard than back squats. Reason being that your limiting factor on a front squat is your core & upper back. Your upper backs ability to stay upright gets to RPE10 meanwhile your glutes & quads are at RPE5.
      it's true only if you don't front squat as the main movement, otherwise you'll develop the specific upper back strength needed. otherwise extreme cases of weightlifters having their front and back squat RMs within a few kilos from each other, or even cases of some lifters who exclusively front squated and ended up with their back squat lagging behind, like Max Aita, wouldn't be possible

  4. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I have literally never felt squats in my knees ever, I'm pretty sure they don't put any strain on your knees at all if you think about it as sticking your butt out and sitting in a chair rather than bending your knees

  5. 1 week ago
    Anonymous

    >(data) were collected from 15 healthy trained individuals
    >15
    To the trash it goes

  6. 1 week ago
    Anonymous

    Front squats are based because they expose un-athletic dyels.

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