Abs Will Get You Girls

I was born in 2000, and how come around the time I was 11 to 13, I thought that the abs were the most important muscles to develop? Was there some sort of programming involved that I likely consumed? I remember frequently making sure to hit the ab machine at the gym. I do recall thinking people who focused so heavily on their biceps and chest as being moronic, though. I also recall around the age of 14 seeing this one guy at the Trader Joe's near my local YMCA with really developed upper body muscles and really skinny legs. His shins looked like sticks.

A Conspiracy Theorist Is Talking Shirt $21.68

It's All Fucked Shirt $22.14

A Conspiracy Theorist Is Talking Shirt $21.68

  1. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Girls were always talking about guys' abs in 2011-2013

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      How did the obsession start? I believe this obsession resulted in girls liking guys who were skinny just because they thought they were attractive because they had visible abs.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Most people nowadays are out of shape.
        Being in shape is attractive; simple as.
        In the early 20th century everyone was skinny but all the girls liked muscular men.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          Actually this. The bar is so low today that's kinda embarrassing.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        It has literally always been like this. My dad is 60 and abs were already the most important muscle during his teens. It has nothing to do with what you think it has.

  2. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    You fell for the twinkcel meme, OP. Still happens today.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      I remember kids in middle school talking about six pack abs being sexy. They didn't care about any of the other muscles.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Reaction to abdominal obesity.

        pecs are more important. then abs.

        The most important muscles are objectively obliques, then forearms, then neck.

  3. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    pecs are more important. then abs.

  4. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I think harry potter? Around that time, schools were teaching us that america is disgusting and obese.
    Also the same time as the release of the final harry potter films, where harry repeatedly goes shirtless and shows us his slim physique.
    Me being the same age as harry, and the films enjoyed by my family, he became a constant subconscious benchmark in which I compared myself to.
    The shirtless scenes always hurt because I was a fat kid, and it was because I was a disgusting american who ate giant hamburgers and corn sugar. Harry's abs burned into my memory as a tormentor for years to come, mocking my doughy body.
    The idea plagued me that I would never have abs like harry, because I was born into this decadent tv couch culture.
    But my spirit was not completely destroyed, and I started researching americans who had transcended their destined forms.
    I spammed ab exercises for the remainder of my teens, trying to grow the abs and starve down the fat.
    Ultimately lost 60 lbs and though I never got the six pack I wanted, i realized that I was in control of my body, not the circumstances of what my culture was like.
    Please clap.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >I spammed ab exercises for the remainder of my teens, trying to grow the abs and starve down the fat.
      I learned pretty early on that you can't have localized fat loss, likely at the age of 11. I actually developed bulimia, and I believe I stunted a few inches off my height. I was the tallest one in the grade, and I ended up being average height. I'm around 5'11.5 now. My bulimia lasted for a really long time, and I likely could've ended up being somewhere between 6'5 and 6'6. I would also be a lot stronger today had I never had bulimia. I didn't begin puberty early, and in fact, kids who were younger than me had more sexually developed characteristics. Anyway, people who think you can have localized fat loss are moronic.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        I'm sorry to hear that you were affected by your body image at a young age. How long did the bulimia go on? It's likely you could have bounced back, in that your potential wasn't limited.

        There are examples of men who trashed their bodies in their teens, 20s, early 30s, and have still developed good physiques, even better than Radcliffe's peak.
        Since you didn't mention your training now, I want to urge you not to feel discouraged by mistakes of the past.

        You described the reason lift
        Bang on the head
        Maybe not Harry Potter but definitely some other shredded character inspired me

        Thanks, that's a great compliment. I only wish I proof read it.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          >How long did the bulimia go on?
          I believe a year and a half to a couple years. I definitely stunted a few inches off my height. If you're in a severe caloric deficit, your body won't allow you to grow. It's not like those growth spurts will happen at a later date. I did end up growing a few inches taller after I started eating normally, but I literally saw everyone else around me grow while I didn't. I was devastated when I realized what happened when I was 14.
          >Since you didn't mention your training now, I want to urge you not to feel discouraged by mistakes of the past.
          I still have a lot of potential. I deadlifted 495 without a belt and without even bracing when I was 17, and I was able to bench 355 every time I did an upper body workout when I was 19 and a half. I had become morbidly obese by then, and I decided to start losing weight. I managed to lose around 100 pounds. I got back into lifting for a year, and then I quit and became an alcoholic due to insomnia. (Yes, literally, I would drink myself to sleep.) This lasted around a year and a half. I stopped drinking a few months ago, and I got back into lifting at the beginning of this year. I went from benching 135 for a couple reps to benching 225 for a couple reps in just five weeks. I don't know how much I can bench now, because I've changed my training to one focused on hypertrophy, lifting in the 5 to 15 rep range, but most commonly in the 6 to 10 rep range, and I always take it slow on the eccentric. I record all my workouts now. Muscle memory is also a very real thing, and I am making strength gains really fast now.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            That's potential for sure. Were you competing? I'm glad the story has a happy end/present.
            12-13 is critical for males so thanks for sharing your cautionary tale, for anyone young who may be lurking. And don't do NOMAD from 16-17 like I did.
            Above all parents should not be letting their kids get obese we can all agree...

            Anyways, 5'11.5" (just say 6ft man) and a stronger base than the average guy, taking your shit seriously, 24, knows how bad alcohol is,, you have a lot to look forward to.

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              Honestly, kids shouldn't even try losing weight until they're 18, but preferably 21. If they're on the low end of morbid obesity, then they could maybe try as young as 16. Younger kids can handle obesity way better than older adults. Obesity also becomes way less of a problem with regular exercise and cardio. The negative effects of being obese are outweighed by the positive effects of physical activity. For example, a high amount of visceral fat results in insulin insensitivity, but serious exercise results in insulin sensitivity, reversing the negative effects of the visceral fat. A lot of things in your body are still developing at that age, including your brain. Personally, bodybuilding competitions shouldn't even be a thing for kids under 18. It's really unhealthy to cut at that age.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          >How long did the bulimia go on?
          I believe a year and a half to a couple years. I definitely stunted a few inches off my height. If you're in a severe caloric deficit, your body won't allow you to grow. It's not like those growth spurts will happen at a later date. I did end up growing a few inches taller after I started eating normally, but I literally saw everyone else around me grow while I didn't. I was devastated when I realized what happened when I was 14.
          >Since you didn't mention your training now, I want to urge you not to feel discouraged by mistakes of the past.
          I still have a lot of potential. I deadlifted 495 without a belt and without even bracing when I was 17, and I was able to bench 355 every time I did an upper body workout when I was 19 and a half. I had become morbidly obese by then, and I decided to start losing weight. I managed to lose around 100 pounds. I got back into lifting for a year, and then I quit and became an alcoholic due to insomnia. (Yes, literally, I would drink myself to sleep.) This lasted around a year and a half. I stopped drinking a few months ago, and I got back into lifting at the beginning of this year. I went from benching 135 for a couple reps to benching 225 for a couple reps in just five weeks. I don't know how much I can bench now, because I've changed my training to one focused on hypertrophy, lifting in the 5 to 15 rep range, but most commonly in the 6 to 10 rep range, and I always take it slow on the eccentric. I record all my workouts now. Muscle memory is also a very real thing, and I am making strength gains really fast now.

          Also, I will turn 24 in June.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      You described the reason lift
      Bang on the head
      Maybe not Harry Potter but definitely some other shredded character inspired me

  5. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I'm 36 and my six pack used to get me laid from 15 to like 18 years old (maybe until 20). I'd just show it off at parties and there would always be girls fawning over it. Once you're "old" a six pack is still impressive but you need a more mature physique, otherwise you just look weak.

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *