BUTT WINK

For once, actually tell me what SPECIFIC stretches should I do to CORRECT it.
>inb4: hamstring stretches
WHICH?
>inb4: hip flexibility
HOW?
>inb4: ankle mobility
WHAT?

  1. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Just give up on barbell squats and do hack-squat machine

    I say this because butt wink also happens in the leg press

    Hack-squat is basically the only main leg exercise you can do that avoids butt wink

  2. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Theres active thread on it right now you lazy trash. Stop squatting below parallel

  3. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >hamstring stretches
    Unnecessary for squats since the hamstrings are slack during them, but do RDLs through a full range of motion and your hamstring flexibility will increase over time (personally went from barely able to touch toes to full pike with bent arms)
    >hip mobility
    Seated good mornings, sit in an ATG wider stance squat and push your knees out as much as you can with your arms for a few minutes. Also weighted tailor's pose for reps and weighted incline pigeon good mornings
    >ankle mobility
    Calf exercises (specifically bent knee eg seated calf raises and KOT calf raises), ATG split squat, sitting in the bottom of an ATG squat and trying to push your knees as far over your toes as possible for a few minutes

    Optionally you can do jefferson curls and/or back extensions with spinal flexion so that you can strengthen your ability to tolerate spinal flexion so if you do end up having buttwink the chance of injury is lessened.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Butt wink is caused by stiff hamstrings. If your hamstrings are tight, you can't keep your butt and hips stuck out all the way at the bottom of a squat and thus your butt gets pulled in

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        No, it's caused by
        >tight glutes and adductors
        >insufficient ability to push knees past the toes
        No one gets limited by tight hamstrings in the squat unless they can't even RDL below their kneecap because the knee bend slackens the hamstrings.

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          It's all these things, and hamstrings play a role too. Hamstrings actually play an important role during the squat, as the exercise is loading both the hips and hamstrings, similar to how the pecs and triceps are carrying the load during a pushup

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            The hamstrings play a very small role in the squat. You can easily test this by doing any knee flexion exercise (hamstring curls, nordic curls) to failure, then a minute or two later doing a set of squats. Your performance will not change at all. The hamstrings act mostly isometrically during a squat because during the descent they lengthen at the hip and shorten at the knee, and during the ascent the opposite occurs. Because of the knee bend in a squat it's virtually impossible to be limited by hamstring flexibility, while being limited by glute or (more commonly) adductor flexibility is much more likely, since these two muscles don't cross the knee joint (or in the case of the adductors most of the muscles as the gracilis does cross the knee joint).

            This is the reason why many people who focus a lot on the squat and neglect hinge pattern motions tend to have small hamstrings despite being extremely strong squatters, it's simply because the hamstrings are not that important in a squat. The adductors and glutes are the main muscles that drive hip extension in the squat, while the hamstrings only play a small stabilizing role. This isn't to say that training your hamstrings won't yield any benefit to your squat, but you could get much more benefit out of doing more training for your quads, adductors, and glutes.

            • 3 weeks ago
              Anonymous

              >Your performance will not change at all. The hamstrings act mostly isometrically during a squat because during the descent they lengthen at the hip and shorten at the knee, and during the ascent the opposite occurs.
              But isn't this a very important part of the squat? Tight hamstrings will prevent us from properly tilting our torso forward and hinging at the hip, and so we will not be able to properly initiate the movement. I think you're right about the other things you said, but if we initiate an exercise with bad form, it's very difficult to fix it in the middle of the rep, especially under load, which is when people get injuries. So hamstrings are very important to be able to stick our hips back and torso out in the beginning of the squat, and when we fail that, it leads to things like butt wink as our body tries to compensate

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                >Tight hamstrings will prevent us from properly tilting our torso forward and hinging at the hip, and so we will not be able to properly initiate the movement.
                I just told you that this is impossible, you would need ridiculously tight hamstrings for this to happen because knee flexion causes the hamstrings to shorten. In fact if you're doing a quad dominant squat your hamstrings are probably more shortened at the bottom than at the top of the movement because of the knee flexion involved. I used to have fairly tight hamstrings and they never caused me a problem at all, and massively increasing the size, strength, and flexibility of my hamstrings didn't really do anything for my squat, simply because they are not that important. Also you're supposed to break at the knees and hips simultaneously, not hips first.

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                >Tight hamstrings will prevent us from properly tilting our torso forward and hinging at the hip, and so we will not be able to properly initiate the movement.
                I just told you that this is impossible, you would need ridiculously tight hamstrings for this to happen because knee flexion causes the hamstrings to shorten. In fact if you're doing a quad dominant squat your hamstrings are probably more shortened at the bottom than at the top of the movement because of the knee flexion involved. I used to have fairly tight hamstrings and they never caused me a problem at all, and massively increasing the size, strength, and flexibility of my hamstrings didn't really do anything for my squat, simply because they are not that important. Also you're supposed to break at the knees and hips simultaneously, not hips first.

                And even if you break at the hips before the knees, you'd only get the equivalent hamstring stretch of doing an RDL to just above your kneecap before your knees bend, which would stop any further stretching of the hamstrings as you enter greater knee flexion during the movement. If you're this tight you straight up cannot bend over more than a few degrees in a pure hinge pattern, which is a major problem you should fix immediately.

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                >Tight hamstrings will prevent us from properly tilting our torso forward and hinging at the hip, and so we will not be able to properly initiate the movement.
                I just told you that this is impossible, you would need ridiculously tight hamstrings for this to happen because knee flexion causes the hamstrings to shorten. In fact if you're doing a quad dominant squat your hamstrings are probably more shortened at the bottom than at the top of the movement because of the knee flexion involved. I used to have fairly tight hamstrings and they never caused me a problem at all, and massively increasing the size, strength, and flexibility of my hamstrings didn't really do anything for my squat, simply because they are not that important. Also you're supposed to break at the knees and hips simultaneously, not hips first.

                I get my advice from smarter people than me so I don't wish to get into any arguments about this topic. I'll just share where I get my info from and whoever is reading can make their own decisions
                Kelly Starrett on butt wink:
                >The butt wink fault occurs when your pelvis tucks underneath your body near the bottom position of the squat. If you start a squat by
                reaching back with your butt and unlocking your abs—overextending the lumbar spine—your femur runs into the top of your hip joint and literally drives your pelvis back like a slow-motion truck accident. The butt wink is the pelvis realigning to a better position. However, the overall system then becomes horribly unstable and poorly braced. This is not a happy place to be, especially with a loaded barbell on your shoulders.
                >If this is your problem, here’s the plan: You need to create and maintain midline stability and torque. If you have tissue restrictions that
                compromise your movement, reduce the depth of your squat and address your posterior chain and hamstring mobility. Remember, you never want to compromise safe form for depth.
                So basically according to Starrett, butt wink happens when you start the squat by sticking the butt out instead of the hamstrings. To do it with proper form he says:
                >Squeeze your butt and stabilize your spine in the top position.
                >Initiate the squat by driving your hamstrings back, not your butt
                >Shove your knees out as far as possible and screw your feet into the ground as you lower into the squat.
                If muscle tightness is causing it, he says to target hips and quads, glutes, calves and heel cord, and hamstrings

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                >The butt wink fault occurs when your pelvis tucks underneath your body near the bottom position of the squat. If you start a squat by reaching back with your butt and unlocking your abs—overextending the lumbar spine—your femur runs into the top of your hip joint and literally drives your pelvis back like a slow-motion truck accident.
                This is happens in many cases because the knees fail to travel far enough forward, which causes overcompensation at the hips which causes this to happen. I have good ankle mobility and I squat in weightlifting shoes so I can actually squat ATG while staying in anterior pelvic tilt if I want to (though I don't and don't recommend it, just that it's perfectly possible for me to do this).

                The other reason that it happens is that your glutes and adductors are tight and cannot stretch any further, which causes your back to get pulled into flexion causing buttwink. Fixing these two issues will resolve buttwink.

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                >The butt wink fault occurs when your pelvis tucks underneath your body near the bottom position of the squat. If you start a squat by reaching back with your butt and unlocking your abs—overextending the lumbar spine—your femur runs into the top of your hip joint and literally drives your pelvis back like a slow-motion truck accident.
                This is happens in many cases because the knees fail to travel far enough forward, which causes overcompensation at the hips which causes this to happen. I have good ankle mobility and I squat in weightlifting shoes so I can actually squat ATG while staying in anterior pelvic tilt if I want to (though I don't and don't recommend it, just that it's perfectly possible for me to do this).

                The other reason that it happens is that your glutes and adductors are tight and cannot stretch any further, which causes your back to get pulled into flexion causing buttwink. Fixing these two issues will resolve buttwink.

                These two points can easily be proven by the fact that virtually anyone can squat ATG with no buttwink even if they have absurdly long femurs if they use enough heel elevation; heel elevation artificially allows your knees to travel much further forward of your toes, while reducing the amount of hip flexion required to reach the bottom position of the squat which means the glutes and adductors undergo less stretch.

              • 3 weeks ago
                Anonymous

                >Tight hamstrings will prevent us from properly tilting our torso forward and hinging at the hip, and so we will not be able to properly initiate the movement.
                I just told you that this is impossible, you would need ridiculously tight hamstrings for this to happen because knee flexion causes the hamstrings to shorten. In fact if you're doing a quad dominant squat your hamstrings are probably more shortened at the bottom than at the top of the movement because of the knee flexion involved. I used to have fairly tight hamstrings and they never caused me a problem at all, and massively increasing the size, strength, and flexibility of my hamstrings didn't really do anything for my squat, simply because they are not that important. Also you're supposed to break at the knees and hips simultaneously, not hips first.

                [...]
                And even if you break at the hips before the knees, you'd only get the equivalent hamstring stretch of doing an RDL to just above your kneecap before your knees bend, which would stop any further stretching of the hamstrings as you enter greater knee flexion during the movement. If you're this tight you straight up cannot bend over more than a few degrees in a pure hinge pattern, which is a major problem you should fix immediately.

                Anyway, to conclude the role of the hamstrings in a squat, their strength matters little because they cannot contribute much force, and in terms of flexibility, the vast majority of people do not have such tight hamstrings that they cannot squat properly, and for the few that are this tight, 3-4 sessions of RDLs would fix this, so even for those people it would only take a week or two to resolve the problem.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            The hamstrings play a very small role in the squat. You can easily test this by doing any knee flexion exercise (hamstring curls, nordic curls) to failure, then a minute or two later doing a set of squats. Your performance will not change at all. The hamstrings act mostly isometrically during a squat because during the descent they lengthen at the hip and shorten at the knee, and during the ascent the opposite occurs. Because of the knee bend in a squat it's virtually impossible to be limited by hamstring flexibility, while being limited by glute or (more commonly) adductor flexibility is much more likely, since these two muscles don't cross the knee joint (or in the case of the adductors most of the muscles as the gracilis does cross the knee joint).

            This is the reason why many people who focus a lot on the squat and neglect hinge pattern motions tend to have small hamstrings despite being extremely strong squatters, it's simply because the hamstrings are not that important in a squat. The adductors and glutes are the main muscles that drive hip extension in the squat, while the hamstrings only play a small stabilizing role. This isn't to say that training your hamstrings won't yield any benefit to your squat, but you could get much more benefit out of doing more training for your quads, adductors, and glutes.

            Also your pecs and triceps example in a pushup isn't very good, considering that while the lateral and medial heads of the tricep do a lot of work in a pushup because they only cross the elbow joint, the long head of the tricep does not do much in a pushup because it is a biarticular muscle that crosses both the elbow and shoulder joint. Because a pushup involves simultaneous elbow extension and shoulder flexion, the long head of the tricep acts mostly isometrically and cannot contribute much to the movement, just like the hamstrings in a squat. As an addendum this is also why the rectus femoris does not get adequetly stimulated from squats, because it performs knee extension and hip flexion, which also means it acts mostly isometrically during squats just like the hamstrings.

  4. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    He also has a lot of different stretching exercises in his book, Becoming a Supple Leopard, just skip to the last chapter to see the exercises. But I also recommend actually reading it because it has good information for athletes.

  5. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Butt wink is literally not a problem

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      it is tho retard. Means youre inflexible lel but keep coping moron

  6. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I started doing couple of sets of good mornings as first exercise every leg day and my squat form vastly improved in few weeks

  7. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I don’t care how many Warwicks there are, once they see what happens the first dozen or so, they are going to be scampering away as fast as their tiny legs can carry them.

  8. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Best exercises for giving this abominable little freak the most painful death imaginable?

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      depth jumps

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