How do I avoid side stitches while running?

How do I avoid side stitches while running? I've been running a lot recently and whenever I feel like I'm doing well in the middle of a run, I try up my pace to improve my times and stamina but immediately get dabbed on by side stitches which quickly ends my run right there. My legs will be burning, I will be completely out breath, and I can still keep on going, but as soon as I feel a hint of a cramp, it almost instantly kills my run. I drink plenty of water throughout the day and try to take deep breaths while running but I still get these. It always happens at the same place around my right rib too for some reason, never the left

  1. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >running

  2. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Lose weight
    If you're super new at running, start slow
    Run to just when you feel it starting then take a break, the length of time you can run without will gradually increase over time. Eventually you will learn to feel the difference between the stitches you can run through and the stitches you will injure yourself if you keep running through

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      I already lost 10 pounds from running the past few months and am I at a very healthy weight for my size right now. I do feel like I'm improving but whenever I try to push myself a bit, I get beaten back by cramps and it feels like a slow crawl toward improvement and that I'm sort of stagnating as a result

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Height/weight?

        What's your pre run nutrition like? Both what you're having vis-a-vis fluid and food and when you're having it in relation to the runs.

        How long are your runs (distance and time)?

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          5'11/165 lbs

          I don't typically eat for several hours before a run but sometimes I'll have a banana or a bar or something an hour or two before

          About 3 miles in around 32 minutes

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            Maybe you are upping your pace too much. Try going just a tiny bit faster.

            You can also try to improve the distance in a comfortable pace.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            As another anon said, I'd focus on increasing distance at a lower pace first. Don't worry about pushing speed, work up your distance and your shorter runs will get faster

  3. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    running is bad for your joints and you look like a homo. swim or bike instead

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      stitches is normal. It's just that you're recruiting muscles that you haven't been using much before you started running. Just ease up a little during the run when you feel it. It won't last

      Only fatties say this

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      >one of humanity's most powerful and innate talents looks gayer than biking and you shouldn't do it
      what

  4. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Everyone gets side stitches running. Stop being a moron and push through them.

  5. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    I don't remember where I read this or if it's true but someone told me to do cyclic breathing while running (in through nose out through mouth) because most cramps are caused by inhaling too much oxygen. Since I started doing this I have literally never gotten stitches again.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      >too much oxygen
      That does not sound right.

      I think this cyclic breathing stuff you would hear from some runners like 15 years ago.
      But if it works for you its fine i guess.

      I very rarely get stitches but if i do I try to get my breathing in a rythm that allows enough air intake.
      Its hard to explain, it comes with experience i guess.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Did the guy who told you that have a white and black checkerboard hat and a mustache?

  6. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Its usually from too much carbon dioxide, your deep breaths are most likely attributing to it, look up better breathing techniques, and dont eat before running that also causes it for me

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      I thought shallow breathing as opposed to deep breathing caused side stitches?

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Its a balance, from deep breaths you are almost certainly inhaling too much co2 and from too shallow breaths not enough oxygen. Look up proper technique. And remember to breath from the diaphragm. I personally breathe quick breaths in a pattern of a 2 stage inhale and a deep exhale to the same cadence. It can be different for everyone.

  7. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    replenish your electrolyes more seriously... I'm talking Snake Juice or generally rehydration salts, and take a high-quality magnesium supplement, or use topical magnesium solution which is also very good. I say high-quality because there are many formulations of magnesium and the cheaper varieties do not absorb in the gut very well. As a consequence (because they are an electrolyte) they pull water into the gut and exert a laxative effect. So you have the double whammy of not absorbing the magnesium very well and then also becoming further dehydrated and losing more electrolytes. Look up the best variety for absorption. This question of electrolytes is especially important if you are on amphetamines, consume a lot of caffeine, take diuretics, or are on statins

    You also need to learn breathing timing/cadence. Most people naturally breath in and breath out as they land on the left and right foot respectively... it's often something like breathing in for 2 steps and then breathing out for two steps. This creates a problem. When you have air in your torso, your intraabdominal pressure is higher and it means the impact of your footfall that is transmitted up through your body is absorbed better. When you have a breath out and no air in your lungs, the shock is much more pronounced and felt. When you breathe out on one footfall (say, the footfall of only your right side) and breathe in the left footfall, and then do this repeatedly over miles, it adds up and sends heightened shock up only one side of the body. I know this sounds strange but it's realy phenomenon, and experienced runners overcome this by training to breath in and out in odd timing so it's not always on the left or right footfall. It'll be like breathe in for 3 steps, breathe out for 2. I have a metronome app that lets me play play custom tones at a designated BPM and that helps me train this breathing

Your email address will not be published.