how do i get ready to start grappling?

me and a friend of mine agreed that we'd both start grappling in the same gym around june which leaves me a shit ton of time to prepare.

is my striking oriented cardio going to be enough or should i start working on it more seriously? also what should i train and how? is turbo bulking a good idea?

(i already wrestle with friends from time to time and i'd say i'm the second strongest in our group)

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  1. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    cringiest thread on here atm

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      hide it and kys while u're at it then

      train pull
      dont bulk
      no ur striking cardio isnt good enough, its different but thats not a big issue
      find videos on youtube for tutorials on how to set up and execute shots and takedowns and how to work from bottom

      any particular channel you'd recommend or is typing 'grappling set ups' on youtube enough?

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Grappling is extremely complicated and fast, if you have no background in it you'll spend a decent bit of time just figuring out how to move your body in the way that is effective for it, let alone individual techniques and setups. Work on your cardio and flexibility.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >any particular channel
        kary colat is well respected but very technical.

  2. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    train pull
    dont bulk
    no ur striking cardio isnt good enough, its different but thats not a big issue
    find videos on youtube for tutorials on how to set up and execute shots and takedowns and how to work from bottom

  3. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Striking cardio is a good foundation to have and will serve you well for wrestling and grappling. I did find myself that after my wrestling and grappling rounds I was way more tired compared to my kickboxing only rounds. It has to do with dealing with greater weight of your opponent, i.e., whole body versus hands, elbows, knees, or legs only.
    I would recommend just wrestling, grappling, and rolling more. You'll learn the art and with experience know when to expend and conserve energy.

  4. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    My advice is to have your dad watch you practice and yell at you whenever you do something wrong and have him make you do extra drills after practice. Make sure he's there at your competitions so you know how disappointed he is when you lose too.

  5. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Do different animal crawls, turkish getups, some slow lift (deadlift, bench, rows). You'll want to develop grind strength and cardio in awkward positions.

  6. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I'm a former high school wrestling champion and I would suggest jogging 2 miles 3 times a week, and sprawling practice. You can't get good at anything wrestling wise by yourself except for two things: cardio and sprawling.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      yah, probably just rolling around and practicing falling would help as well

  7. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Heavy lifting, isometrics and cardio.
    The physically stronger you are, specially your grip and entire posterior chain the better you will be at it.
    Any conventional strength training routine is fine but you can add weighted carries to make it more specific.
    For the isometrics you can do pauses inbetween reps and hold for 10 seconds at the end of a set but you'll have to use submax weight for a set or do overcoming isometrics at the beginning of your workout, you can also squeeze a bag or a ball in your arms simulating arm positions in wrestling and grappling and squeeze as hard as you can to build strength in those positions.
    Finish your workouts with a grip strength routine, preferably with something thick to build that squeezing strength, it can be fat grips on farmer walks and deadhangs or rows and pull ups on a thick rope, towel pull ups also help.

    For cardio the best way to build conditioning is to jog for 1 minute at 60% intensity and sprint for 10-30 seconds and repeat for the duration of your run, you can do that with any exercise really but running is the best example, just switch from a moderately high pace to an all out effort pace and repeat that interval several times.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      This anon gets it, when I joined my hs wrestling team I was good at two things, climbing and deadlifts. Get good at both of those now, another anon recommended pulling exercises and I agree.

  8. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Just start early at a different gym and be like i dont know bro i just find it easy i must be a natural

  9. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Sounds gay anon

  10. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Oil yourself up and wrestle the homeless

  11. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Not OP but is Sambo actually worth learning for ground skills?

    >Trained Muay Thai for 3 years
    >Sunday I rolled with a mate that wrestles (Greco-Roman) who is shorter and weighs less than me
    >Got absolutely BTFO I felt violated... my standup skills meant absolutely nothing

    There's a combat Sambo gym nearby but wanted to know if it's worth learning that or BJJ?

    (Mate that wrestles lives interstate so can't really train with him.)

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Is better than nothing and way better than bjj for sure.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Thank you anon i will go tonight

  12. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Read this: https://www.grapplearts.com/bjj-roadmap-book/
    It's not a cheat code, but it will give you the basic vocabulary and concepts. When you start drilling and rolling, your first goal is just orientation: where am I? What position am I in? Where is my opponent? Where is he moving, what is he doing?

    Work on your mobility. Make your joints as healthy and strong and supple as possible. Kneesovertoes guy and other stuff along those lines can help. Keep lifting. I think strength training, and specifically working on joint health and mobility are the best things you can do to support your grappling training.

    >is my striking oriented cardio going to be enough or should i start working on it more seriously?
    Working on cardio is fine, but IMHO you're going to be exhausted anyway when you start. It's just a different kind of work. If you've only got so much time/energy in a day, I'd focus on strength and mobility.

    >also what should i train and how?
    There's at least a few different schools of thought regarding lifting for grappling. One is, just do basic athletic strength training. Basically the same stuff guys on the football team would do: squat, deadlift, bench, power clean, etc.

    Another theory I've heard is that straight up bodybuilding-style training is actually best, because you're training time under tension, which is more applicable to the grind/pressure of grappling than "explosive" lifting. Interesting idea. Also, working on isolation lifts makes sense, because you can work on strengthening specific joints that might be vulnerable in grappling.

    And then there's the funky meme stuff, like kettlebells, Bulgarian bags, maces, clubs, etc etc.
    Basically anything that's been featured in a movie training montage in the last ten years. I dunno, maybe there's something to it.

    >is turbo bulking a good idea?
    No.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      read through the pdf quickly and it actually looks super helpful. thanks a ton for your answer honestly!! i'm actually glad to see that my grappling training routine shouldnt differ from my bodybuilding routine

  13. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Rowing and you can shuffle around in wrestling stance.

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