How long will it take me to get buff?

If I'm eating enough calories and working out everyday how long do you think it will take to get "big" or above average?

  1. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    Front angle

    • 3 months ago
      Anonymous

      8 months if you actually stick to it

      Thanks for the advice bro... what is the sticky?

      First post in the catalog newfag

      • 3 months ago
        Anonymous

        The muscle mass, initial bodyfat, and stronglift links are dead

      • 3 months ago
        Anonymous

        The guy in this pic is 6'3 and went from 165 to 200lbs in less than a year if I remember the og thread.

  2. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    Don't workout everyday. Get a program that works for you. Eat 500 calories above your TDEE. Read the sticky.

    • 3 months ago
      Anonymous

      Thanks for the advice bro... what is the sticky?

  3. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    >yes officer one escaped hes right here

  4. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    GOLEM GET YE GONE

  5. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    I'm assuming this isn't you of the filenames. But from skinny-skinny to what most people would recognize as fit, buff, jacked ect probably a year if everything goes perfect (it never does) you're probably looking at 3 years with an injury or two that stops you for month or two.

  6. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    Obv you are skelly mode but you actually have an excellent frame/foundation for building a good physique... it will take a while though. You look like an ectomorph / hard gainer so you will want to bulk for a while with a significant caloric surplus. It will probably take a year to see meaningful change, and I recommend that you spend most of it building up a foundation of strength and form competency with the most essential compound lifts:
    >bench press
    >incline bench press
    >Close grip bench press
    >Dips
    >OHP
    >Squats
    >DL
    >Pullups
    >rows (can be machine/cable)
    >closegrip chinups (for bis/back)
    I would separate these into a Push/Pull/Leg split and do the whole split twice a week if you are able... otherwise do it with enough rest to keep yourself fresh and strong and free of injury. Spend quality time online learning the correct form and expect to devote a lot of your gym time in the beginning to doing these lifts with extremely light weight or with assistance to make them easier (resistance bands, assisted pullup/dip machine, etc). For example you are going to have to use resistance bands to learn how to do a pullup or dip because I expect you won't have the strength for even one in the beginning. It is important to nail form in the beginning because if you just leap in and do it however you want, you are liable to end up with bad "movement programming" that will be very hard to change later

    • 3 months ago
      Anonymous

      i bet op can do 20 pull ups with ease, he looks like one of those skellys.

    • 3 months ago
      Anonymous

      Thank you for your in depth response bro... going to try and do the workouts you suggested and trying to eat as much and as often as I can to maximise gainz 🙂

      • 3 months ago
        Anonymous

        my pleasure, good luck in your journey. In a way I wish I could go back and start from square one also. All the best moments and rewards are ahead of you as you meet your goals, enjoy them as they come

    • 3 months ago
      Anonymous

      How much of this can I do with dumbbeells at home

      • 3 months ago
        Anonymous

        without a large dumbbell set in 5-10lb increments going up to maybe 60-70lbs, it's gonna be pretty hard to make much progress or step up in weight you lift. You're also going to need a bench that can be set flat or at various angles for incline press or OHP. Plus a pullup bar. But really you should be learning all these things on a barbell along with dumbbells. For example, on my pressing days, I do both barbell bench, barbell incline, and DB versions of those presses because they do different things. Barbell lets you lift heavier and builds strength, and DBs have a different range of motion and develop minor stabilizing muscles.

        Honestly I know it sounds prohibitively expensive to get a gym membership or maybe you don't want to look stupid learning how to do your lifts in front of other people, but you will progress way faster at a gym and have a much better workout. Also never underestimate how much seeing other strong/fit people do their lifts can inspire you to work hard... I have no idea how people have home gyms and stay fully motivated. Plus, its nice to have a consistent audience of regular gymgoers who are there to admire your progress from being a tiny weakling to getting big and fit

        • 3 months ago
          Anonymous

          > need a bench that can be set flat
          He can just floor press, not that chest is that important. I'm sure he'll be fine without a gym membership until he can OHP a 60lbs dumbbell.
          The only problem is the lack of hip hinge movement, which means either meme shit like single leg RDLs or kettlebell swings.
          Personally I think KB are better than DB for a poverty tier homegym.

          >I have no idea how people have home gyms and stay fully motivated
          Once you've hit rock bottom it's easy to stay motivated so you never get back there.

          But yeah the problem with KB is that they suck for hypertrophy. Good for strength and conditioning though. Barbell is king but it's also expensive, takes a lot of space, need to have proper technique.

          • 3 months ago
            Anonymous

            I disagree. If he is trying to build out his body, he is absolutely going to value chest strength/mass and will not be fine with floor presses... floor presses literally turn a press into a half rep and is pretty much the domain of the triceps in the bench's ROM. There is no incline press capability there, and I don't think it will be very possible or productive for a beginner to try and elevate heavy dumbbells to shoulder height for standing OHP. He will get a lot further with OHP if he's doing seated ones. Also he is going to want a gym membership long before OHPing 60lb DBs... that weight is pretty advanced for OHP even for people who are regular gymgoers.

            This is all a moot point though because OP should be getting a gym membership if he's serious

            • 3 months ago
              Anonymous

              I've been wanting to get a gym membership but to be totally honest I am a bit self conscious about my size with my height in comparison so other "gym lads" I know its probably nothing to worry about and it's just in my head but I would feel really embarrassed if anyone laughed or said something in person. It's easy to handle any criticism about my size on here because I'm anonymous but it's different in person if that makes sense?

            • 3 months ago
              Anonymous

              Yeah, fair enough. Still an acceptable option imo but all the points you raise are valid.

  7. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    THANK YOU HUNGRY SKELETON

  8. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    Supplement leucine, a lot of it. At least 5g per day. Trust me.

    Do Dips, Pull Ups/Chin Ups and Pistol Squats mainly. Everything else is a bonus. Maybe add Shoulder Press too. Eat at least 2000 calories. Consume at least 60g of protein.

    Good luck

  9. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    When I started lifting, I was 6'4", 155 pounds. In 6 months I was 6'4", 180 pounds OP.

    • 3 months ago
      Anonymous

      I'm currently 6ft 2" and 127lbs but want to get to around 160ish if I can. There have been some pretty helpful advice in this thread that I am going to use and hopefully in 6 months to a year I can do it!

  10. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    literally built for gomad

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