Is a 6'4 guy who squats 315 stronger than a 5'4 guy who squats 315?

The weight is the same. Does moving the bar and extra 8 inches or whatever mean the tall guy will have more real world strength?

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  1. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    For reasons other than strength, the midget is cooked

  2. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    The taller man probably has more bodyweight so he's pushing more.

    Assuming they are the same weight, their strength is the same. What is different would be power. If they were to both throw a kick, the longer leg would generate more power at the tip all things being equal. It's kind of like how you flick your wrist but it makes the tip of a whip go 700mph, but not quite as extreme.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      If you were training for kicking power you'd be training kickboxing or muay thai not squats though so this is still a stupid judgment imo. Plus the manlet would still have balance and center of mass on his side.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        it's all hypothetical you moron. he was making a point and you missed it.

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Hypothetically suck my wiener you fat homosexual.

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            excellent retort sir, well done

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      > What is different would be power.
      You don't know what power is.

      If you go by w = F*d then yes, the taller guy is stronger. He's doing more work every rep.

      > If you go by w = F*d then yes, the taller guy is stronger. He's doing more work every rep.
      Why are you conflating strength and work? Strength is the F of that equation; if we consider work on the bar, and assume both lifters lift the bar at constant velocity, then they both exert the same force on the bar, the taller one just does more work because the d is larger; F (i.e., strength) is the same in both scenarios.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >Why are you conflating strength and work?
        Strength is a loaded word I guess. The weight on the bar matters obviously, but I'm sure 99% of people would call the guy who can do more reps at the same weight "stronger" (can do more work overall).

  3. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    No the Lanklet has more bone mass than the manlet.
    Bones > Muscle > Fat
    Also the 315lbs on the manlet is has less surface area to spread, so the manlet is under more tension than the lanklet.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      muhfugging thicc bones. Stfu, moron

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Absolute cope.

        [...]
        Yes. The tall guy will have better leverage in real world applications. Like ask both those guys to do a strongman stone off with the same weight. 5'4" guy couldn't do shit, lmao. Real world objects in real scenarios won't magically scale in size, shape, and balance to fit perfectly in the hands of the tiny guy.

        Fat is less dense than muscle and muscles are less dense than bones.
        Keep coping.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Absolute cope.

      https://i.imgur.com/BAXjANZ.jpeg

      The weight is the same. Does moving the bar and extra 8 inches or whatever mean the tall guy will have more real world strength?

      Yes. The tall guy will have better leverage in real world applications. Like ask both those guys to do a strongman stone off with the same weight. 5'4" guy couldn't do shit, lmao. Real world objects in real scenarios won't magically scale in size, shape, and balance to fit perfectly in the hands of the tiny guy.

  4. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Tall man will be stronger as his range of motion is longer for every rep. Manlet will appear to have relatively bigger muscles as they are not as stretched out throughout his short bones. Also manlets have been bread through history to be both more aggressive and have slightly better muscle building genes to be able to compete. Same principals as with dog breads

  5. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Taller guy has more bodyweight, and more ROM
    He generates much more force than the smaller guy

  6. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    How did someone get a manul for their home?

  7. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    If you go by w = F*d then yes, the taller guy is stronger. He's doing more work every rep.

  8. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    The manlet would have better leverage so it balances out in terms of real strength (as they're literally lifting the same), in a technical sense yes the muscles on the tall guy would be stronger, but it literally doesn't matter in real terms.

  9. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    taller guy is stronger

  10. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    If 2 people squat the same weight, the lighter one is stronger (ie the manlet.) Especially if the squats are comparable like both normal highbar squats. Odds are the manlet will be more "powerful" as well (ie he will move a given weight faster than the weak lanklet.)

  11. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    taller guy is stronger for the simple reason that his rom is greater. if we equalize the rom he would move more weight

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      This argument makes sense

      > What is different would be power.
      You don't know what power is.

      [...]
      > If you go by w = F*d then yes, the taller guy is stronger. He's doing more work every rep.
      Why are you conflating strength and work? Strength is the F of that equation; if we consider work on the bar, and assume both lifters lift the bar at constant velocity, then they both exert the same force on the bar, the taller one just does more work because the d is larger; F (i.e., strength) is the same in both scenarios.

      But you need to exert more F to do more work
      Right? More force is needed to push a boulder up a hill than to push it two feet uphill

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        > But you need to exert more F to do more work
        No, moron. W = F * d. If you keep F constant and increase d, work still increases.
        In fact you can do arbitrarily large amounts of work with arbitrarily small forces by doing it over arbitrarily large distances (displacements for conservative fields).

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          >No, moron. W = F * d. If you keep F constant and increase d, work still increases.
          I meant "more" as in more quantity of the same level of F.
          Anyways that's getting convoluted. Doing more work means more strength. Like doing five reps instead of one.

          no. simply consider the bodyweight to weight lifted ratio and cope
          >lifts weights in a gym
          >"tall guy will have more real world strength?"
          LMAO are you lifting in the metaverse?? this is the real world, brainlett

          >simply consider the bodyweight to weight lifted ratio
          Yes, what does this matter? as

          https://i.imgur.com/xDplNex.jpeg

          >consider the bodyweight to weight lifted ratio
          This you?

          points out.

  12. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    no. simply consider the bodyweight to weight lifted ratio and cope
    >lifts weights in a gym
    >"tall guy will have more real world strength?"
    LMAO are you lifting in the metaverse?? this is the real world, brainlett

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >consider the bodyweight to weight lifted ratio
      This you?

  13. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I can not answer your question, but rather than asking who's stronger you should be asking who's less weak.

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