My local store has started selling tallow cheaper than the butter.

My local store has started selling tallow cheaper than the butter.

Is there any downside from replacing all my cooking fat with tallow? Using it on bread to make sandwiches?

How long does tallow last, how long would a supply stored in 5C last? Freezing it?

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  1. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    You'll become a lardass.

  2. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Try out tallow first then see if you like it then make decision afterwards

    Don't replace all your cooking fat with tallow immediately

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Make sure it's actually tallow. Lots of the packaged tubs of "tallow" have a frick ton of hydrogenated basedbean oil and other shit in it. They apparently think "tallow" or "lard" is a generic term for "solid fat".

      Tried it, it's legit. Good taste but subtle/hard to point out. Used it to fry 200g of chopped up onion and 120g of ham.

      Really like it, this might also just be my brain going "new cool thing placebo" but it feels like I need way less of it compared to say frying in olive oil.

      Also according to the packaging it lasts for 8 months cooled, so gonna by up a stack of 1kg total next time I shop

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Tallow, or any animal fat, can make for a tasty additive to some dishes. On the rare occasion I make hash browns or home fries, I always use a combo of peanut oil and beef tallow/bacon grease (whatever I have handy). That's one of the secrets to a good fried potato. A mixture of peanut oil and some kinda animal fat. That and draining the starch and blanching.

  3. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    the real take is that all those fat wars are nearly pointless, if its cheap use it

  4. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    It's inferior to butter in every way

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Butter is for sissies
      Real men use tallow.

      Personally I even put it (raw) in my bread

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Butter has a better taste for dishes when you are using it to incorporate into a sauce etc. But tallow is better as a sauce.

      https://i.imgur.com/ilRHN6J.png

      [...]
      Tried it, it's legit. Good taste but subtle/hard to point out. Used it to fry 200g of chopped up onion and 120g of ham.

      Really like it, this might also just be my brain going "new cool thing placebo" but it feels like I need way less of it compared to say frying in olive oil.

      Also according to the packaging it lasts for 8 months cooled, so gonna by up a stack of 1kg total next time I shop

      Olive oil doesn't actually fry, it will burn well before you get a crisp brown texture. Saute yeah when you are carmelizing onions olive oil can do that etc.

      Toxins comes from smoke?
      How does all that work?

      would you huff a tailpipe?

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        but tallow is better to cook if you are just trying to sear meat.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        The toxic bullshit from tailpipes comes from gasoline being burned. The smoke from cooking comes from things that are safe to consume being burned. How does burning into smoke turn healthy food into toxins?

  5. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    It's probably shit quality from feedlot animals so it will be higher in omega 6 but then again the butter is probably the same so there's not really a downside unless you don't like the taste

  6. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Make sure it's actually tallow. Lots of the packaged tubs of "tallow" have a frick ton of hydrogenated basedbean oil and other shit in it. They apparently think "tallow" or "lard" is a generic term for "solid fat".

  7. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    I cook with tallow all the time. In bulk amounts it's saved me lots of money compared to using other cooking fats. Less expensive than butter, and also not a seed oil, and also tastes fine. Would recommend.

  8. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Tallow has a higher smoke point, so you'll generate fewer toxins while cooking. It's higher in stearic acid, which is a magical molecule for metabolic health. It contains fewer inflammatory proteins than butter, which some people can be sensitive to. Real grass fed tallow is better than butter on paper in just about every way.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Toxins comes from smoke?
      How does all that work?

  9. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Tallow mogs butter and every other oil.

  10. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Wouldn’t recommend it as a spread. Gonna be rock solid at room temperature and doesn’t impart a ton of flavor by itself

  11. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    What even is that?

  12. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    If it's high quality should be good for a year at room temp. If it's hot enough to turn to a liquid, then put it in the fridge. I think it has the same melting point as coconut oil. Also if it's cheaper than butter it's probably less nutritious and potentially toxic, so make sure it's from a good source

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      I left mine at room temp and I dunno, had no major issues. Stayed perfectly the same. But it didn't go to brick status.. Nutrition label just is grass-fed rendered beef tallow. Ordered 4 gallons of it off Amazon for something like $30.

  13. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    i rendered the fat of every meat i cooked for a while and used it to cook with. but thats just because im a poor redneck.

  14. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    theyre both good. any animal fat is gonna be better than seed oils but maybe beware fat from monogastric animals if they are fed poor diets as their fat tissue will reflect what they are fed. lard or chicken fat from industrial animals will probably not be great for you

  15. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    I usually make tallow but when I buy it it costs $10+/lb from the butcher. If yours is cheaper than butter then you're buying low quality shit tallow.

  16. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Tallow isn't really ever used as anything other than a cooking oil alternative to seed oils. It has a mostly neutral taste, although some say it can have a strong taste and makes the food it's fried in taste like tallow.

    You wouldn't use tallow to make sandwiches, butter is far tastier as it's essentially a solidified cream with salt added.

    If it wasn't for the smoke point, I'd use butter for everything. Use tallow for searing meats.

    Another downside with tallow is that it tends to go back to its solid form after frying, so don't make eggs in it unless you want little tallow fat beans lodged in them.

    Also, general rule of thumb is to get organic whether it's butter or tallow. (organic butter legit tastes better)

    Good luck, Anon

  17. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Tallow has a higher cooking temperature so it's more versatile. You can even use it for frying. It'll last you months, tallow hardly spoils. Tatewise I'd say it's mid. Butter is def better taste wise.

  18. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >How long does tallow last, how long would a supply stored in 5C last? Freezing it?
    It lasts practically forever. It was the key íngredient in pemmican for that exact reason.

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