Why boxers have the best physiques? How do they train to look like that?

Why boxers have the best physiques? How do they train to look like that?

  1. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    They dont

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Tyson moggs him

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >why do boxers have the best physiques?
        >why does this one individual in a sport have a good physique?

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      any sport that utilizes all the muscles will have a pretty good body.

      sexyama truly is a gifted old fart

  2. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >Why boxers have the best physiques?
    functional athleticism and cutting

  3. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Boxers have shit physiques actually
    Grapplers on the other hand

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >this bro was at the olympics
      WADA on suicide watch

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      > when she says she likes a 'dad bod'

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Is this shit natty?

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        certainly not

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Highly unlikely

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Agreed

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Yoel, gear or not, is a turbo freak.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >left-handed coomer

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      But is he 5’6?

  4. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    all fighters are cardio bunnies in the first place.
    then they do calistneics
    wheight training is optional and highly dependant on the individual.

    there was an unknown youtube channel once where an old pupil of cusdamato uploaded peekaboo boxing traing vids. i asked if he let his boxers do weights and he said it was individual.

    tyson as an example was naturally heavy and built - so calisthenics was enough

  5. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    They roid.

  6. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Anon just look at how people train for boxing

  7. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I did boxing for awhile. It is literally all cardio we did 3 minutes 3 times for every bag exercise with 1 minute rests between these exercises

  8. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    A lot of them are just lean, and they build some upper body muscle from either calisthenics or weights.
    It's mostly cardio. Footwork, jump rope, bag work, etc.

  9. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >Brutal cuts
    >Endless cardio
    >Autistic coaches that micromanage every aspect of your regiment
    >Treats you like a gladiator slave
    >Test boost from sparring everyday
    >Test boost from boozing and whoring after winning

  10. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Cardio

  11. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Like most athletes. Functional intervals mostly, some weights and conditioning. And, training every day, sometimes twice.

  12. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I did boxing training for a few months with my college football team (our goalkeeping coach was an ex-boxer) and it's seriously fucking tough. The get good results because they put in hard work.

  13. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Boxfag here, 6 amateur fights, from LH to HW.
    It's a blended discipline. Even outside of traditional "boxing stuff" like sparring, bag and mitt work, you'll do a lot of extra cardio, both LISS (3-5 mile runs, skipping rope for time, etc.), and HIIT like sprints, intense jump rope, circuits of different calisthenics and general aerobics (high knees, jumping jacks, burpee, crap like that) etc. Boxing is not really one workout or fitness discipline but an amalgamation of cardio, explosiveness, power, muscular endurance, technique, footwork, reactivity, etc. So in boxing there are many "mini workouts" that hit a certain aspect that you cobble together into your overall program. One day you might be doing mitts or working the bag and then doing some hanging leg raises, the next you're pushing a weighted sled then doing hill sprints, etc. Heavy traditional weight training is sporadic and uncommon, but calisthenics are part of daily life, light dumbbells in high rep ranges for certain exercise are used frequently, and some guys lift sometimes but I don't want to oversell that because its honestly not common. Even if you don't intend to ever fight, it's a great discipline for fitness. I enjoy it. Any questions just ask.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >it's a great discipline for fitness
      It is, except for the blows to the head. Over the years those will get you eventually.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Can’t you just ask for no head shots in sparring or something? If you’re just doing it for fitness I don’t see why you need to kill your brain.

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          I wouldn’t know how to specifically set up boxing for fitness only. I was doing some jujitsu years back and it started to worry me a bit. Well now I do downhill racing so maybe not much better though.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Can’t you just ask for no head shots in sparring or something? If you’re just doing it for fitness I don’t see why you need to kill your brain.

        I am

        Boxfag here, 6 amateur fights, from LH to HW.
        It's a blended discipline. Even outside of traditional "boxing stuff" like sparring, bag and mitt work, you'll do a lot of extra cardio, both LISS (3-5 mile runs, skipping rope for time, etc.), and HIIT like sprints, intense jump rope, circuits of different calisthenics and general aerobics (high knees, jumping jacks, burpee, crap like that) etc. Boxing is not really one workout or fitness discipline but an amalgamation of cardio, explosiveness, power, muscular endurance, technique, footwork, reactivity, etc. So in boxing there are many "mini workouts" that hit a certain aspect that you cobble together into your overall program. One day you might be doing mitts or working the bag and then doing some hanging leg raises, the next you're pushing a weighted sled then doing hill sprints, etc. Heavy traditional weight training is sporadic and uncommon, but calisthenics are part of daily life, light dumbbells in high rep ranges for certain exercise are used frequently, and some guys lift sometimes but I don't want to oversell that because its honestly not common. Even if you don't intend to ever fight, it's a great discipline for fitness. I enjoy it. Any questions just ask.

        replying to both of you. Many places offer "boxfit" which is essentially the training you would do to be a fighter, just minus the actual sparring and fighting. Other places may have certain nights that are low intensity/power which they may or may not refer to as technique sparring. Some clubs will have a rule of heavier body shots with very light or no head shots depending on their rules. Sparring is obviously critical to being a fighter (as is shadowboxing, which I stupidly didn't mention in my first post despite it being arguably the most important thing to consistently do l) but if you have no intention of being a fighter, who cares. My club has different classes/nights for beginners and non-competitive as well as the pro and competitive team. You usually start in the lighter one and if you are comfortable and enjoying it move up to the competitive scene that is usually rougher sparring, as a lot of the guys are in camp. But even pros spar lightly sometimes.

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          that actually sounds pretty good

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            I had absolutely no intention of ever fighting when I started. I just wanted to lose weight and do some non-boring cardio after a lifetime of strongman injuries kept frustrating my weight lifting. Fell in love with it, started sparring, then started fighting a few months after that. Been 2.5 years now, life has improved in so many ways. I'd recommend checking it out and starting light and easy on the fitness side if you're new and then just seeing where it takes you. A good coach will make you feel welcome and comfortable whether you want to fight competitively or just learn the fundamentals and develop some skills.

  14. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Olympic wrestling is the true sport of chads

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Sunder is an amazing talent. One of the best in recent memory.
      A shame he was born at the same time into the same weight class as Sadulaev.

  15. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >How do they train to look like that?

  16. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    it's literally just the cut + genetics because weight classes so you can see their goodies on display, gay
    and PEDs because competitive

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