will bjj build an aesthetic physique as the sole source of training in your life? im a short, small, and skinny person.

will bjj build an aesthetic physique as the sole source of training in your life?

im a short, small, and skinny person. i just want to add a little bit more muscle, and lean out until i have abs. i know bjj will definitely help me get lean since ill be doing it very frequently, but will it help me build/maintain 5-10 pounds more muscle as an untrained person?

i see a lot of bjj guys with impressive physiques but i dont know what other training they are doing.

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  1. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    blowjobjob

  2. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Most BJJ guys are doing what wrestlers do: weight training and cardio (mostly high intensity). Even the lightweights are doing calisthenics

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      what type of weight training do you think comprises most of their training?

      maximal strength/powerlifting? plyometrics? oly lifts?

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Functional fitness and compound movements.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          obviously compound movements yes but "functional fitness" has become such a meme buzzword that i dont even know what that refers to anymore. care to elaborate?

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            Sport specific movements

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              The wonderful thing about lifting is that it is extremely general so you don't have to autistic plan out excercises that mimic some movement within your sport of choice. Actual "sport specific" excercises should look like the scott lift for wrestling, not some joel sneedman bullshit.

              • 1 month ago
                Anonymous

                Autism style planning is typically the common denominator for top BJJ athletes.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          lets say you're on gear like the rest of the top guys...
          gordon ryan literally does bodybuilding hypertrophy workouts. is that optimal or something only he could get away with due to his genetic ability?

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            I don't think its optimal. To me optimal is a dedicated sport specific strength program written and overseen by a MMA/BJJ personal trainer like a Phil Daru.
            But having said that people who bad mouth that style of training for athletes don't know what they're talking about. You can still have a good carry over to your jiu jitsu from doing BB style workouts as long as you don't completely overdo them and then have your skill work (bjj) negatively be effected from fatigue.

  3. 1 month ago
    Anonymous
  4. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    By itself, no. I looked like shit when I was only doing it. I lift alongside it now and look way better.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      how did you program that with your recovery? i feel like these top competitor guys are training bjj multiple times a day, so i dont know how they are also lifting hard enough to get good gains.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Drugs

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        by blasting test like everyone who does a martial art and lifts alongside it frequently

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        I don’t train like a top competitor anymore because I don’t fraud that that was leaving me with injuries. The only way you can train that often and build mass is to fraud unless you are a freak of freaks.

        I do bjj 3X a week and lift 4 days a week. Lift on the days I don’t roll. Have one rest day, but I don’t often go hard in bjj. Plus the more experience you get, the easier it is to manage energy and not break yourself down.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          off topic a bit but is training only 3x a week enough to be relatively competitive? i feel like i have to choose between 5-6x a week if i want to compete vs 3x a week with lifting if i want to not look dyel.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            as long as you spend those 3 days effectively training and not just free rolling all the time, yea.

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              The more you train, the better you will be. I haven’t competed in a couple of years, but if you spend a lot of time drilling techniques and studying others outside of class, 3 days is enough.

              appreciate that guys. and huge agree on the free rolls. they have their place but positional rolling always seemed the best to actually grow your game.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            The more you train, the better you will be. I haven’t competed in a couple of years, but if you spend a lot of time drilling techniques and studying others outside of class, 3 days is enough.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            Maybe to win a few local tournaments.
            But you won't win any major tournaments training 3-4 days a week.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Reminder adcc doesn't drug test and gordon ryan is quite open about being in gear. Not sure about ibjjf

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          ibjjf tests black belts at major tournaments
          ( euros, pans, worlds)

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            Fair enough. My one and only tournament (grappling industries) didn't but if you're frauding to win amateur regions tournaments you have some major issues

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              Agreed, but I know a few dudes who fraud to win a few over hyped super fights against scrub grapplers and have "NAGA world champion" in their instagram bio's lmao. Serious issues there.
              If you're going to roid in a sport like BJJ that offers no money and only glory you have to have high aspirations and go to win a major tournament at the very least.

  5. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    No, there's plenty of people in my gym who do bjj consistently and nothing else and they don't have aesthetic physiques.

    Unlike wrestling or swimming there's not a lot of muscle recruitment and strength.

    The reason bjj competitors look "aesthetic" is because:
    1-They lift weights, almost every elite athlete in every sport lift weights.
    2-They're lean as frick, due to weight cutting + Insane amounts of cardio from training hours everyday
    3-Afaik the major bjj organizations don't drug test. So most if not all athletes are on drugs.

    although one thing I found is that doing a sport + lifting produces better results than just lifting by itself. I have some friends who only lift, and others who do mma/bjj + lifting and the latter almost always have more impressive physiques.

  6. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Frick no, actually fit bjjcels lift weights for their strength training.
    If you want to do a combat sport where you can get stronger, more muscular without doing extra lifting do judo or wrestling.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      No, there's plenty of people in my gym who do bjj consistently and nothing else and they don't have aesthetic physiques.

      Unlike wrestling or swimming there's not a lot of muscle recruitment and strength.

      The reason bjj competitors look "aesthetic" is because:
      1-They lift weights, almost every elite athlete in every sport lift weights.
      2-They're lean as frick, due to weight cutting + Insane amounts of cardio from training hours everyday
      3-Afaik the major bjj organizations don't drug test. So most if not all athletes are on drugs.

      although one thing I found is that doing a sport + lifting produces better results than just lifting by itself. I have some friends who only lift, and others who do mma/bjj + lifting and the latter almost always have more impressive physiques.

      im really confused on why bjj wouldnt have muscle recruitment and strength stimulus, or how wrestling/judo is any different. when ive trained bjj i felt like i was essentially wrestling with submissions. mind you i train nogi, and im VERY short and small for a man, so i tend to have to use a lot of strength to get my gameplan going even with good technique.
      i suppose the culture of bjj wanting pure tech over strength has something to do with it, but i dont see how training the way most new age american nogi gyms train is any different than wrestling.

      i will certainly agree that weightlifting is ideal though.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Because wrestling is the only things wrestlers do. Wrestlers do 10x more wrestling than bjj athletes.
        In bjj as soon as the fight hits the ground there is barely any strength involved in most cases. Say you're on mount and you're trying to get an arm triangle, that's not really conducive to any muscle gain.

        On the other hand a wrestler trying to do a single leg or a suplex is using shit loads of strength/muscle recruitement.

        One thing bjj does develop is grip strength.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          Your fricking moronic and clearly have never rolled with a strong. physical BJJ guy.
          Strength absolutely matters even on the ground, try holding down a strong dude who outweighs you while he is trying to explode out of mount.
          It is technical to keep someone pinned but strength is absolutely in the picture.
          Also to hold positioning it requires a ton of contracting against a resisting opponent, that can definitely build muscle. Will it be as effective for muscle gain as lifting weights? obviously not but to say its completely ineffective is a truly moronic take.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            Not nearly as much as the strength required for wrestling.
            There's a reason why only the genuinely strong bjj guys are the ones the lift a lot and everyone else is dyel as frick.

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              Ok and I never said it was superior to wrestling for strength training.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Bjj is nowhere near as intense as judo or wrestling.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          i think it entirely depends on the intensity of the spar. class is most definitely less intense but when it comes time to roll it could be a 10% flow roll or a 100% all out bath salts scramble fest. i wouldnt say its inherently less intense but bjj culture is about being a homosexual, pulling guard, and holding on for dear life to someones pajama pants.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            No by nature of the techniques it inherently less intense, in bjj the vast majority of techniques are performed on the ground wich inherently removes some of the weight of your opponent, in judo and wrestling you have yo learn to control their entire body wich makes you a lot stronger.
            Is like calisthenics vs weights, calisthenics can obviously make you stronger just like bjj and some of the moves are hard and will give you a decent bit of strength but with weights or judo and wrestling you are moving much more weight with much more resistance wich results in greater gains.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      also, unless you wrested in hs/college theres no way to learn wrestling. its not something you can just go be a hobbyist and train for unless there are schools opening up elsewhere that im not aware of.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        That's only true in the US.

        Even in the US mma gyms and bjj gyms give wrestling classes. People like Gordon Ryan who've never done wrestling can probably outwrestle 99% of wrestlers in a grappling match.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          this is true, but typically those classes are like 1-2x a week to support a bjj/mma program. not usually a full wrestling school for adults as theres no competitions outsides of schools really.

  7. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I broke my ankle doing bjj

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      i partially tore my ankle ligament

  8. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >will bjj build an aesthetic physique as the sole source of training in your life?
    No

  9. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    most pros are on steroids and train BJJ 6 -7 days a week & lift 3-4 days a week.
    It's great cardio and can build muscle just by the constant squeezing against resistance required but it can't be your only source of training for the goals you have in mind.

  10. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >i see a lot of bjj guys with impressive physiques but i dont know what other training they are doing.
    my sweet summer child, brazillians have no issue at all with roids (unlike pissy americanoids) so most guys in the sport are juiced to the gills and lift weights too obviously

  11. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Look at Craig Jones - one of the best BJJ grapplers in the sport and even roids but focuses 100% on BJJ and I'd guess rarely/never lifts to supplement. This is probably the body that best demonstrates 100% BJJ dedication.

    Compare to Nicky Rod or Gordon Ryan, two other roiding BJJ athletes that do lift and look huge (at least when gordons not shitting out his large intestine). Gordon Ryan has a lifting instructional but it's reasonably well documented he does most of his lifts at 20 reps.

    A great thing about starting BJJ tho is that it gives you a reason to lift. Getting stronger and using your strength to manhandle white belts on the mat is fantastic motivation.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Craig jones also doesn't have the best genetics for lifting. Theres plenty of guys who lift , take roids and train BJJ intensely who look like shit still.
      Gordon and Nicky both have very good genetics for an impressive physique and would probably still look good with a 100% BJJ dedication

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        I don't think BJJ will give you enough resistance to build visible muscle. I'd guess natty full-time BJJ folks would top out at lean skinny builds like Ryan Hall, Keenan Cornelius. Keep in mind the load on your muscles decreases as skill increases.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          >load on your muscles decreases as your skill increases
          this. its seems like the common pipeline is that fatties start bjj, lose a shitload of weight, and then get fat again once they start getting around purple belt level lmao. the top belts at my gym other than the instructor at all fat cause they effortlessly dunk on everyone.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            The only two flavors purples come in are
            > 10th plant hyperflexible twinks that either heel hook you and tear your ACL or play rubber guard and tear their own
            > Fat hairy bearded Greek guy who sweats the same liquid that leaks out of gyros

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          Mikey musumeci is probably peak no lifting natty bjj purist

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            I'm pretty sure he lifts, at least does calisthenics.

            lets say you're on gear like the rest of the top guys...
            gordon ryan literally does bodybuilding hypertrophy workouts. is that optimal or something only he could get away with due to his genetic ability?

            Bodybuilding style training is underrated for athletes, it's great for recovery, great to avoid muscle imbalances, and great for injury prevention. The "functional" crossfit style that a lot of fighters use, and the powerlifting style shit that is peddled a lot are both really overrated for combat sports IMO. Personally, most of my performance gains were gained from calisthenics with moderate reps using rings.

            • 1 month ago
              Anonymous

              weighted calisthenics or just body weight?

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            I'd agree with this. Even if he lifts you could attain this with BJJ alone.

  12. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Im thinking of starting bjj, but dont really have much time (work 50 hours a week, have a 1 year old, and go to the gym to strength train 4x a week). I was thinking to do 1x a week class, at least to start.

    Is this moronic, or will i still be able to make some okay progress

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      once a week is better than none. you will certainly progress, but you need to make that class count.
      of course it will be considerably slower than the other students, which you already knew, and you wont be competing either.
      personally, to get the most out of training, and to make the cost worth it, id recommend 2 days minimum, or one class and attend the open mat for lots of free/positional rolling. just my two cents.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        My local gym has different prices for 1x a week, 2x a week, or unlimited, so I was gonna opt for the once a week

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          then go for it. theres a lot to gain from doing it. increased confidence, self defence, building friendships with people, and the fact that its fricking fun. just understand the limitations of not training more. if you can find a way to make time for one more day id recommend it.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      You'll be able to make progress and may even cut down on your lifting to make an extra BJJ class if you get the bug right away.
      But in the beginning it may be hard sounds like your schedule is super packed and you may be too mentally fried to go to BJJ and do something challenging after a long day of work along with a wife / 1 year old baby at home.
      but frick it give it a shot its really fun.

  13. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >BJJ
    *blocks ur path*

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous
      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        https://i.imgur.com/nesFWW2.jpg

        >BJJ
        *blocks ur path*

        There’s definitely something in the water these days.

  14. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    idk I took Japanese jiu jitsu growing up with very minimal sparing so I have no idea if its actually useful.

  15. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I have voluntarily dislocating shoulders that often pop out during rolls and get inflamed for like a week, any lifts for this feel?
    t. 1/1.5/2.5/3.5 dyel

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